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What does one here think: Is a person, having reached the path, able, would he, reject a request of something material, incl. strength and effort in material spheres, if he could share?

In what cases, if he could reject, would he?

(Note: not given for trade, exchange, stacks or entertainment that binds here in this wheel, but as a tiny door out)

closed as primarily opinion-based by Andrei Volkov May 24 at 11:56

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  • It would probably good to give it free to be answered. – Samana Johann Jun 8 at 12:01
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What does one here think: Is a person, having reached the path, able, would he, reject a request of something material, incl. strength and effort in material spheres, if he could share?

I may have missed it, but i have yet to find something in buddhism that says we should give or agree on something that will be harmful to ourselves (as well as what is harmful to others, of course).

In what cases, if he could reject, would he?

I'm not sure there are any hard rules. It seems that it depends on the situation. I hope someone who knows the sutras better than me could chime in on this.

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Could it be hurtful for one to answer this or is this place void of Sotapannas or advanced?

Of course he/she couldn't reject and if spoken of "hurt oneself" means that it would require to break the precepts, since such is understood as hurtful for oneself.

Having abounded all kind of maccharia and void of ingratitude (having won firm faith in kamma), with the attaining of the path, a person is unable to reject a request that does not require to hurt whom ever knowingly (e.g. goes against the precepts)

"And what is the treasure of generosity? There is the case of a disciple of the noble ones, his awareness cleansed of the stain of stinginess, living at home, freely generous, openhanded, delighting in being magnanimous, responsive to requests, delighting in the distribution of alms. This is called the treasure of generosity.

That being the reason, Bhikkhus are restricted in accepting alms form those "fit to training" to avoid that families would grow poor. More in an "alien" sphere here.

(Note that it is not given for trade, exchange, stacks or what ever binds to this wheel here, but for higher and liberation)

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