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As a practical observation, if one were staying below arhat for the initial aeons, could monastic living limit the efficacy of a bodhisattva? Since that goal heavily rests on seclusion, and both the wandering and monastic models were developed to enhance seclusion, shouldn't a different, more open model of monkhood exist? They should be able to have kids at least for example, since it would help them to help more beings.

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    I think this is better as a comment than an answer: I don't understand, "They should be able to have kids at least for example, since it would help them to help more beings." Because the number of children who you help as a teacher -- e.g. 20 or 30 per year in a class -- might be more numerous than the number as a parent. And perhaps you're even better able as a teacher, too, with time and space and training and assistants. Although yes, acting as a teacher might be a lay occupation too -- and you might say the same (as a teacher) about acting as a doctor, or a bus driver. – ChrisW Mar 20 at 11:06
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    Very opinion-based, would be hard to answer with anything but personal opinions. Could this be reformulated to be more Dharma-based? – Andrei Volkov Mar 20 at 11:31
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    Apparently a "good answer" is usually "based on" something: e.g. "a reference", or, "personal experience". And, maybe as Andrei said, I don't think it's immediately clear how a reference or personal experience (not just opinion) should an inform an answer to the current question. – ChrisW Mar 20 at 14:01
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As a practical observation, per AN4.99 there are four kinds of people found in the world:

One who practices to benefit themselves, but not others;

one who practices to benefit others, but not themselves;

one who practices to benefit neither themselves nor others; and

one who practices to benefit both themselves and others. ...

And how does a person practice to benefit both themselves and others? It’s when a person doesn’t kill, etc. … and encourages others to do the same. That’s how a person practices to benefit both themselves and others.

The best is one who practices to benefit both themselves and others (see AN4.95):

But the person who practices to benefit both themselves and others is the foremost, best, chief, highest, and finest of the four.

Note that this advice applies to all people, not just monastics. Therefore it would also apply to people who take Bodhisatta vows. It would also apply to people who have or do not have children.

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