1

How would/should a perfect monk appear, act and possible serve you?

Or from Buddhas view if wishing to try to answer this?

Good if remarking whether a claim one would have or possible good for a monk (the used perspective of individual "issues")

[One may render it how ever wished for better lucie to nurish stackes and much exchange and no fear if not wishing to use it for liberation]

  • Is this question explicitly asking for opinions? Should this be closed as a polling question? – Andrei Volkov Feb 25 at 13:30
  • Maybe I've been inconsistent in my use of "polling" but I think that strictly that means not just "asking users" but more especially "asking about users" (e.g. "how many of you have had this experience?", "what proportion of users are Theravada?", etc.). Perhaps it's subjective or a matter of opinion, the Good Subjective, Bad Subjective blog article suggested that a good answer to a subjective question should be based on something e.g. either a reference or personal experience. – ChrisW Feb 25 at 13:39
  • oh really? And both, all three: own, buddhist, and the Buddhas. Who would like opinions? Or to give ones opinion to a question? Who like to lose ones stand by being pulled by ones thought? – Samana Johann Feb 25 at 13:40
  • @SamanaJohann the comments by moderators are not for chit-chat. When we need your input, we will ask you. Until then, please keep it to yourself. – Andrei Volkov Feb 25 at 17:13
  • 1
    @Damith I thought that "from Buddha's view" could mean "according to the suttas". I didn't understand the next bit ("Good if...") at all, no idea what that's asking or suggesting.. – ChrisW Feb 27 at 4:51
3

There is no perfection can be found in the realm of forms. Only Nibbana is perfect. Even an Arahant who attained Nibbana permanently and have great wisdom, higher goodness and intelligence still has to live in the limitations of a human form until s/he dies.

So a monk mustn't try to be perfect, or try to be better than he is. I think that a monk's first duty must be adapting more and more to meditation. Meditation doesn't necessarily mean formal meditation, but a monk must try to adap himself more to mindfulness. That's the only way for any human being-not only for a monk-to better himself/herself. If a monk realizes Nibbana he mustn't hide his situation from his community and must immediately share his situation with the abbot and other qualified monks in the monastery. That is absolutely necessary. (The people who realized Nibbana before they ordain must do the same thing too)

Other than that everything will take care of itself. The monks who makes mindfulness the priority in their lifes will eventually become better human beings, act better, serve better. Trying to reach to the "perfection" can be harmful. Monks are human beings and they mustn't be too hard on themselves.

  • "Trying to reach to the "perfection" can be harmful. Monks are human beings and they mustn't be too hard on themselves." Harmful, why? Not hard: ever perfect (Arahat)? – Samana Johann Feb 25 at 23:28
  • "Perfection" is a broad term, and useless in last term when not defined well enough. Something is "perfect" always in respect to some subjective and madeup standard. If one tries to excel in every aspect of human existence, that search can lead to madness, because it will be a non-ending search. Kind regards! – Brian Díaz Flores Feb 26 at 18:56
  • Good Post Brian. To Murathan: A monk is definitely encouraged to be "better than he is" in order to realize the factors of the path. Arousing wholesome states of mind and preventing & getting rid of unwholesome states of mind are over and over emphasized, which needs intention & exertion. Nevertheless, I fully agree with your ideas of perfection. It is better to think in terms of improving and step-by-step change than to strive for the perfect which can be out of reach, resulting in discouragement. – Val Feb 27 at 14:12
  • I agree you but mindfulness is always accepting what is there in your mind in the present moment rather than trying to change yourself. Mindfulness removes any goals and grounds you in the present moment. Transformation/changing gradually happens by itself. – Murathan1 Feb 27 at 15:13
2

From the Ajaniya Sutta, we find that the ideal monk should be consummate in beauty, strength and speed (like a thoroughbred horse):

"In the same way, a monk endowed with these three qualities is worthy of gifts, worthy of hospitality, worthy of offerings, worthy of respect, an unexcelled field of merit for the world. Which three? There is the case where a monk is consummate in beauty, consummate in strength, and consummate in speed.

"And how is a monk consummate in beauty? There is the case where a monk is virtuous. He dwells restrained in accordance with the Patimokkha, consummate in his behavior & sphere of activity. He trains himself, having undertaken the training rules, seeing danger in the slightest fault. This is how a monk is consummate in beauty.

"And how is a monk consummate in strength? There is the case where a monk keeps his persistence aroused for abandoning unskillful mental qualities and taking on skillful mental qualities. He is steadfast, solid in his effort, not shirking his duties with regard to skillful mental qualities. This is how a monk is consummate in strength.

"And how is a monk consummate in speed? There is the case where a monk discerns as it actually is present that 'This is stress.' He discerns as it actually is present that 'This is the origination of stress.' He discerns as it actually is present that 'This is the cessation of stress.' He discerns as it actually is present that 'This is the path of practice leading to the cessation of stress.' This is how a monk is consummate in speed.

From the Akkhama Sutta, we find that the ideal monk should be resilient to sights, sounds, aromas, flavors and tactile sensations :

"In the same way, a monk endowed with five qualities is deserving of gifts, deserving of hospitality, deserving of offerings, deserving of respect, an unexcelled field of merit for the world. Which five? There is the case where a monk is resilient to sights, resilient to sounds, resilient to aromas, resilient to flavors, resilient to tactile sensations.

"And how is a monk resilient to sights? There is the case where a monk, on seeing a sight with the eye, feels no passion for a sight that incites passion and can center his mind. This is how a monk is resilient to sights.

"And how is a monk resilient to sounds? There is the case where a monk, on hearing a sound with the ear, feels no passion for a sound that incites passion and can center his mind. This is how a monk is resilient to sounds.

"And how is a monk resilient to aromas? There is the case where a monk, on smelling an aroma with the nose, feels no passion for an aroma that incites passion and can center his mind. This is how a monk is resilient to aromas.

"And how is a monk resilient to flavors? There is the case where a monk, on tasting a flavor with the tongue, feels no passion for a flavor that incites passion and can center his mind. This is how a monk is resilient to flavors.

"And how is a monk resilient to tactile sensations? There is the case where a monk, on touching a tactile sensation with the body, feels no passion for a tactile sensation that incites passion and can center his mind. This is how a monk is resilient to tactile sensations.

"Endowed with these five qualities, a monk is deserving of gifts, deserving of hospitality, deserving of offerings, deserving of respect, an unexcelled field of merit for the world."

The Sotar Sutta describes how an ideal monk should be a listener, a destroyer, a protector, an endurer and a goer.

"In the same way, a monk endowed with five qualities is deserving of gifts, deserving of hospitality, deserving of offerings, deserving of respect, an unexcelled field of merit for the world. Which five? There is the case where a monk is a listener, a destroyer, a protector, an endurer, and a goer.

"And how is a monk a listener? There is the case where, when the Dhamma & Discipline declared by the Tathagata is being taught, a monk pays attention, applies his whole mind, and lends ear to the Dhamma. This is how a monk is a listener.

"And how is a monk a destroyer? There is the case where a monk does not tolerate an arisen thought of sensuality. He abandons it, destroys it, dispels it, & wipes it out of existence. He does not tolerate an arisen thought of ill will... an arisen thought of cruelty... He does not tolerate arisen evil, unskillful mental qualities. He abandons them, destroys them, dispels them, & wipes them out of existence. This is how a monk is a destroyer.

"And how is a monk a protector? There is the case where a monk, on seeing a form with the eye, does not grasp at any theme or particulars by which — if he were to dwell without restraint over the faculty of the eye — evil, unskillful qualities such as greed or distress might assail him. He practices with restraint. He guards the faculty of the eye. He achieves restraint with regard to the faculty of the eye.

"On hearing a sound with the ear...

"On smelling an aroma with the nose...

"On tasting a flavor with the tongue...

"On touching a tactile sensation with the body...

"On cognizing an idea with the intellect, he does not grasp at any theme or particulars by which — if he were to dwell without restraint over the faculty of the intellect — evil, unskillful qualities such as greed or distress might assail him. He practices with restraint. He guards the faculty of the intellect. He achieves restraint with regard to the faculty of the intellect.

"This is how a monk is a protector.

"And how is a monk an endurer? There is the case where a monk is resilient to cold, heat, hunger, & thirst; the touch of flies, mosquitoes, wind, sun, & reptiles; ill-spoken, unwelcome words & bodily feelings that, when they arise, are painful, racking, sharp, piercing, disagreeable, displeasing, & menacing to life. This is how a monk is an endurer.

"And how is a monk a goer? There is the case where a monk goes right away to that direction to which he has never been before in the course of this long stretch of time — in other words, to the resolution of all fabrications, the relinquishment of all acquisitions, the ending of craving, dispassion, cessation, Unbinding. This is how a monk is a goer.

"Endowed with these five qualities a monk is deserving of gifts, deserving of hospitality, deserving of offerings, deserving of respect, an unexcelled field of merit for the world."

The Ajanna Sutta states how an ideal monk should have eight qualities.

"In the same way, a monk endowed with eight qualities is worthy of gifts, worthy of hospitality, worthy of offerings, worthy of respect, an incomparable field of merit for the world. Which eight?

(1) "There is the case where a monk is virtuous. He dwells restrained in accordance with the Patimokkha, consummate in his behavior & sphere of activity. He trains himself, having undertaken the training rules, seeing danger in the slightest faults.

(2) "When given food, whether coarse or refined, he eats it carefully, without complaining.

(3) "He feels disgust at bodily misconduct, verbal misconduct, mental misconduct, at the development of evil, unskillful [mental] qualities.

(4) "He is composed & easy to live with, and doesn't harass the other monks.

(5) "Whatever tricks or deceits or wiles or subterfuges he has, he shows them as they actually are to the Teacher or to his knowledgeable companions in the holy life, so that the Teacher or his knowledgeable companions in the holy life can try to straighten them out.

(6) "When in training he gives rise to the thought, 'Whether the other monks want to train or not, I'll train here.'

(7) "When going, he goes the straight path; here the straight path is this: right view, right resolve, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, right concentration.

(8) "He dwells with his persistence aroused, [thinking,] 'Gladly would I let the flesh & blood in my body dry up, leaving just the skin, tendons, & bones, but if I have not attained what can be reached through human steadfastness, human persistence, human striving, there will be no relaxing my persistence.'"

"Endowed with these eight qualities, a monk is worthy of gifts, worthy of hospitality, worthy of offerings, worthy of respect, an incomparable field of merit for the world."

  • Sadhu! How ever, Nyom, take care not to make shares not given "for commercial purpose". Just let Atma ask: would Nyom Rubben ever meet such? How could he? – Samana Johann Feb 25 at 14:10
0

A perfect monk keeps silent unless requested to speak & teach. The Lord Buddha praised silence.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.