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Is there any equivalent quotation from the Buddhist scriptures to the following from the Christian Bible (Matthew 7:3-5)?

Why do you look at the speck of sawdust in your brother’s eye and pay no attention to the plank in your own eye? How can you say to your brother, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ when all the time there is a plank in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the plank out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to remove the speck from your brother’s eye.

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SN 55.7; MN 8; Dhp 158-159; MN 40

  1. One should first establish oneself in what is proper; then only should one instruct others. Thus the wise man will not be reproached.

  2. One should do what one teaches others to do; if one would train others, one should be well controlled oneself. Difficult, indeed, is self-control.


SN 55.7 Since I dislike this thing, how can I inflict it on someone else?

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So then the bamboo acrobat said this to his assistant Medakathalika: "You look after me, my dear Medakathalika, and I'll look after you. Thus with us looking after one another, guarding one another, we'll show off our craft, receive some payment, and safely climb down the bamboo pole."

This being said, the assistant Medakathalika said this to the bamboo acrobat: "That will not do at all, master! You look after yourself, master, and I will look after myself. Thus with each of us looking after ourselves, guarding ourselves, we'll show off our craft, receive some payment, and safely climb down from the bamboo pole. That's the right way to do it!" ~~ SN 47.19 ~~

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From Dhammapada 50:

Verse 50: One should not consider the faults of others, nor their doing or not doing good or bad deeds. One should consider only whether one has done or not done good or bad deeds.

Alternative translation from here:

  1. Let none find fault with others; let none see the omissions and commissions of others. But let one see one's own acts, done and undone.

The commentary states:

The Story of the Ascetic Paveyya

While residing at the Jetavana monastery, the Buddha uttered Verse (50) of this book, with reference to the ascetic Paveyya and a rich lady.

A rich lady of Savatthi had adopted Paveyya, an ascetic, as a son and was looking after his needs. When she heard her neighbours talking in praise of the Buddha, she wished very much to invite him to her house to offer him alms-food. So, the Buddha was invited and choice food was offered. As the Buddha was expressing appreciation (anumodana), Paveyya, who was in the next room, fumed with rage. He blamed and cursed the lady for venerating the Buddha. The lady heard him cursing and shouting and felt so ashamed that she could not concentrate on what the Buddha was saying. The Buddha told her not to be concerned about those curses and threats, but to concentrate only on her own good and bad deeds.

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 50: One should not consider the faults of others, nor their doing or not doing good or bad deeds. One should consider only whether one has done or not done good or bad deeds.

At the end of the discourse the rich lady attained Sotapatti Fruition.


From Dhammapada 252:

Verse 252: It is easy to see the faults of others, but difficult to see one's own. A man broadcasts the fault; of others like winnowing chaff in the wind, but hides his own faults as a crafty fowler covers himself.

The commentary states:

The Story of Mendaka the Rich Man

While residing near the town of Baddiya, the Buddha uttered Verse (252) of this book with reference to the renowned rich man Mendaka and his family.

Once, during his tour of Anga and Uttara regions, the Buddha saw in his vision that time was ripe for Mendaka, his wife, his son, his daughter-in-law, his granddaughter and his servant, to attain Sotapatti Fruition. Seeing the prospect of these six people attaining Sotapatti Fruition, the Buddha went to the town of Baddiya.

Mendaka was an extremely rich man. It was said that he found a large number of life-size golden statues of goats in his backyard. For this reason, he was known as Mendaka (a goat) the rich man. Again, it was also said that during the time of Vipassi Buddha he had donated a monastery for Vipassi Buddha and a congregation hall complete with a platform for the preacher. On completion of these buildings he made offerings of alms-food to Vipassi Buddha and the bhikkhus for four months. Then, in yet another of his past existences, when he was a rich man in Baranasi, there was a famine throughout the region. One day, they had cooked a meal just enough for the members of the family when a paccekabuddha stood at the door for alms-food. Then and there he offered all the food. But due to his great faith and generosity, the rice pot was later found to be miraculously filled up again; so also were his granaries.

Mendaka and his family, hearing that the Buddha was coming to Baddiya, went to pay homage to him. After hearing the discourse given by the Buddha, Mendaka, his wife Candapaduma, his son Danancaya, his daughter-in-law Sumanadevi, his granddaughter Visakha and the servant Punna attained Sotapatti Fruition. Mendaka then told the Buddha how on his way, some ascetics had spoken ill of the Buddha and had tried to dissuade him from coming to see him. The Buddha then said, "My disciple, it is natural for people not to see one's own faults, and to exaggerate other people's faults and failings."

Then the Buddha spoke in verse as follows:

Verse 252: It is easy to see the faults of others, but difficult to see one's own. A man broadcasts the fault; of others like winnowing chaff in the wind, but hides his own faults as a crafty fowler covers himself.

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Regard him as one who
       points out
       treasure,
the wise one who
seeing your faults
       rebukes you.
Stay with this sort of sage.
For the one who stays
with a sage of this sort,
       things get better,
       not worse.

Let him admonish, instruct,
    deflect you
away from poor manners.
To the good, he's endearing;
to the bad, he's not.

Panditavagga

[Not given for stacks, exchange, world-binding trades but as gift for an escape frim this wheel]

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