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I'm curious to know and understand more how would a Buddhist deal with wastage under the following circumstances :

i)If it was an impulsive buy and you don't like the item after that and at the same time don't wanna keep it as it may took up the space available. Or would you rather just use it but you are obviously unhappy using it.

ii)If it was something edible, e.g. you thought of trying out new food but realize later it doesn't suit your tastebud or worse, you find it hard to finish it.

iii)Someone got you a gift but you may not like it or it's not something you want, would you keep it? By keeping it and not using it is equivalent to wastage or would you rather use it but deep down you wont't feel happy using it cos it's not something you want. The struggle or rather dilemma is you may just use it cos you don't wanna disappoint the person who gave you the gift but on the other hand, how do you even find peace and happiness doing something you may not like.

I'm constantly at the crossroad of learning to be grateful for what i have for many of them out there may not be able to have what i have. But i can't find peace or even happiness if it causes great deal of pain for accepting something which i don't like or it's not something i wanted. I'm assuming Buddhism does not teach us to accept blindly even you can't. How do you even live a life like that? Feel free to share your thoughts. Thanks & sadhu sadhu sadhu...

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If you don't want or don't need something that you have, donate it or give it away to others who need it, instead of throwing it away.

Donating to monks or virtuous people is better than donating to unvirtuous people. But any kind of donation, even to animals, is a source of merit.

From AN 3.57:

"I tell you, Vaccha, even if a person throws the rinsings of a bowl or a cup into a village pool or pond, thinking, 'May whatever animals live here feed on this,' that would be a source of merit, to say nothing of what is given to human beings. But I do say that what is given to a virtuous person is of great fruit, and not so much what is given to an unvirtuous person.

Wastage of things and wealth in Buddhism is not about throwing things away. Rather it's about not using things and wealth for the benefit of oneself and/or others.

From SN 3.19:

"That's the way it is, great king. That's the way it is. When a person of no integrity acquires lavish wealth, he doesn't provide for his own pleasure & satisfaction, nor for the pleasure & satisfaction of his parents, nor for the pleasure & satisfaction of his wife & children; nor for the pleasure & satisfaction of his slaves, servants, & assistants; nor for the pleasure & satisfaction of his friends. He doesn't institute for brahmans & contemplatives offerings of supreme aim, heavenly, resulting in happiness, leading to heaven. When his wealth isn't properly put to use, kings make off with it, or thieves make off with it, or fire burns it, or water sweeps it away, or hateful heirs make off with it. Thus his wealth, not properly put to use, goes to waste and not to any good use.

"But when a person of integrity acquires lavish wealth, he provides for his own pleasure & satisfaction, for the pleasure & satisfaction of his parents, the pleasure & satisfaction of his wife & children; the pleasure & satisfaction of his slaves, servants, & assistants; and the pleasure & satisfaction of his friends. He institutes for brahmans & contemplatives offerings of supreme aim, heavenly, resulting in happiness, leading to heaven. When his wealth is properly put to use, kings don't make off with it, thieves don't make off with it, fire doesn't burn it, water doesn't sweep it away, and hateful heirs don't make off with it. Thus his wealth, properly put to use, goes to a good use and not to waste.

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There are many Sutta and Vinaya deals with waste. Most of the instructions are for monks in regard to the use of food, lodging, and clothes. The instructions to lay, followers, are found in Parabhava and Sigalovada Sutta.

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The Kula Sutta refers to how wealth & material goods are preserved & not wasted, as follows:

In every case where a family cannot hold onto its great wealth for long, it is for one or another of these four reasons. Which four? They don't look for things that are lost. They don't repair things that have gotten old. They are immoderate in consuming food and drink. They place a woman or man of no virtue or principles in the position of authority. In every case where a family cannot hold onto its great wealth for long, it is for one or another of these four reasons.

Apart from this, Buddhism also teaches generosity is a valuable practise. If we have things we do not need or want, we can simply give them to other people.

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