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And also need to know, where it includes in tipitaka..

  • How does one give "fearlessness"? Please elaborate on your question. – Lanka Jan 29 at 18:15
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here is the sutta about giving a lack of fear

https://suttacentral.net/an8.39/en/sujato

There are, bhikkhus, these five gifts, great gifts, primal, of long standing, traditional, ancient, unadulterated and never before adulterated, which are not being adulterated and will not be adulterated, not repudiated by wise ascetics and brahmins. What five?

6(4) “Here, a noble disciple, having abandoned the destruction of life, abstains from the destruction of life. By abstaining from the destruction of life, the noble disciple gives to an immeasurable number of beings freedom from fear, enmity, and affliction. He himself in turn enjoys immeasurable freedom from fear, enmity, and affliction. This is the first gift, a great gift, primal, of long standing, traditional, ancient, unadulterated and never before adulterated, which is not being adulterated and will not be adulterated, not repudiated by wise ascetics and brahmins. This is the fourth stream of merit … that leads to what is wished for, desired, and agreeable, to one’s welfare and happiness.

7(5)–(8) “Again, a noble disciple, having abandoned the taking of what is not given, abstains from taking what is not given … abstains from sexual misconduct … abstains from false speech … abstains from liquor, wine, and intoxicants, the basis for heedlessness. By abstaining from liquor, wine, and intoxicants, the basis for heedlessness, the noble disciple gives to an immeasurable number of beings freedom from fear, enmity, and affliction. He himself in turn enjoys immeasurable freedom from fear, enmity, and affliction. This is the fifth gift, a great gift, primal, of long standing, traditional, ancient, unadulterated and never before adulterated, which is not being adulterated and will not be adulterated, not repudiated by wise ascetics and brahmins. This is the eighth stream of merit an.iv.247 … that leads to what is wished for, desired, and agreeable, to one’s welfare and happiness.

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Young householder,

The merits of keeping the Silas (precepts), are not easy to measure, but in short next to become fearless and untouchable -- see also: The rewards of virtue, and, The Five Precepts.

And in short:

Imāni pañca sikkhā-padāni:

These are the five training rules.

Sīlena sugatiṃ yanti.

Through virtue they go to a good bourn.

Sīlena bhoga-sampadā.

Through virtue is wealth attained.

Sīlena nibbutiṃ yanti.

Through virtue they go to Liberation.

Tasmā sīlaṃ visodhaye.

Therefore we should purify our virtue.

People with little-to-no virtue fear much, but don't fear to act for their demerits, and so lose more and more. Not in this sphere, this is the merit of the given: some till final and total fearlessness. So don't waste time, no way to trade this in other ways.

Desiring further, best look here: Perfect virtue

My person guesses that the phenomena "Momo" is surely one example of cause and effect, totally present in this internet realm, and a great sign (or warning) to be heedful, even more all the time.

This example may help to show that sharing some specific fear, as a warning, is not in principle wrong but can be more that just ordinarily compassionate. The importance by giving certain samvega ("fear") is to give the exit from unskillful fear as well.

So it can be that someone giving fearlessness out of impure motivation cuts himself off from being given helpful fear as well, and may get lost in foolish not-knowing equanimity, with no more giver of useful advice.

That's an important point in a pseudo-liberal confused world, and invites not to dwell "like sheep", as the Buddha called such wrong-agreed assemblies.

If feeling insulted rather than conductive motivated toward good, let it be know. Ones own choices where one is headed to.

[Note: missuse of Dhamma in not given ways causes not only fear for others but also for one self, so one may not use it for worldly trade, exchanges, stackes...]

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