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If Buddhists themselves cannot agree on which scriptural writings or traditions for practice are actually true statements from the Buddha, how can Buddhism as a system claim any truth?

The above question raised due to there are many articles discussing, or discrediting the authenticity of some Sutras/Suttas and doctrines. Since the Buddha never written down his teachings himself, how does the Buddhist scriptures transmit from the Buddha to us according to historical documentation, text, or evidence?

By saying "Buddhism as a system" I meant what is the original content of Buddhism through investigating the original scriptures' transmission history. In this way we can discern what teaching is included in the original content; and what is excluded even missing from the original content, i.e., outside the system.

closed as unclear what you're asking by ChrisW Dec 8 '18 at 14:57

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    I think this question doesn't make sense -- firstly, because people may or not make "claims", whereas "systems" don't; and secondly, if it's so that Buddhists "cannot agree" then perhaps "Buddhism as a system" is not what you call "a system" -- or it's not one system, and you might ask instead what different Buddhists (different schools) decide for themselves about which scripture. – ChrisW Dec 8 '18 at 14:57
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    Possibly related: What teachings do all schools of Buddhism share? – ChrisW Dec 8 '18 at 15:00
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    if physicists themselves cannot agree on which scientific writings or traditions for experiment are actually true statements, how can physics as a system claim any truth? Because, like Buddhists, they verify through personal experience and discussion. – OyaMist Dec 8 '18 at 22:26
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    What an excellent question. I share your view that the dissent within Buddhism does it a lot of damage and also religion as a whole. But this is a can of worms. Nagarjuna attempted to address this problem but his work is rejected by many Buddhists. We can claim truth for the 'Buddhist system' but we have to deny the views of many Buddhists to do it. I'm not sure why Buddhists do not worry more about this.problem. – PeterJ Dec 9 '18 at 12:56
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    I share the view of @PeterJ that many genuine Buddhists who treated the teachings not merely an intellectual exercise, nor a subject to write scholastic thesis, but for a real belief also for practice, do worry about this problem. It is a good question asked, I edited it in response to ChrisW's comment to lift the [on hold] tag – Mishu 米殊 Dec 11 '18 at 6:51

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