1

It is generally held that there are four stages of enlightenment, namely, Soatapanna, Sakadagami, Anagami and Arahant. These stages are achieved by a practitioner as she/he gradually eradicates the ten fetters. I need the complete reference of these topics (four stages and ten fetters) in the first four Nikayas of the Pali canon. Can anyone help me?

  • 1
    When you ask for "the complete reference" I think you're not asking for answers with any individual references to suttas (e.g. MN 118) -- instead you want a reference to a commentary, essay, or book which includes all the references. I think there may be at least one such about stream-winning, at least (but I don't remember anyone mentioning one about the latter three). Also, I guess you know, I think it's detailed in the Visuddhimagga (which you're excluding in this question). – ChrisW Sep 4 '18 at 10:30
  • Yes, I am actually searching for a scholarly work on this topic which is based on the complete reference from Sutta Pitaka, like say the book by Sue Hamilton for the Khandhas or the book by Gethin for the Bodhipakkhiya Dhammas. In this case, it may not necessarily be a book. A long essay might suffice, or some reasonably long chapter of a general treatise on Buddhism. It will be very helpful if you can suggest such a work. By the way, what is the name of the work on stream-winning? – Soumen Sep 4 '18 at 15:50
  • There's a Sottapana Handbook, and, Into the Stream: A Study Guide on the First Stage of Awakening, both online. – ChrisW Sep 4 '18 at 17:21
  • Thanks. The compilation by Thanissaro Bhikkhu seems to be particularly suited for me. There are two reasons for this: first, I am already familiar with his writing and I "trust" him; second, he has given the references of the canonical books through the Sutta numbers, not through the page numbers of the particular English translations. – Soumen Sep 5 '18 at 6:52
2

It appears in many sutta of many nikāya.

The Example

Sutta Pitaka Vol 1 : Sutta. Tī. Sī Mahālisuttaṃ:

‘And what, Sir, may those other things be?’

‘In the first place, Mahāli, a brother by the complete destruction of the Three Bonds (the Delusions of self, Doubt, and Trust in the efficacy of good works and ceremonies) becomes a converted man, one who cannot be reborn in any state of woe, and is assured of attaining to the Insight (of the stages higher still). That, Mahāli, is a condition, higher and sweeter, for the sake of which the brethren lead the religious life under me.

‘And then further, Mahāli, a brother by the complete destruction of those Three Bonds, and by reducing to a minimum lust, ill-will, and dullness, becomes a Once-returner, one who on his first return to this world shall make an end of pain. That, Mahāli, is a condition higher still and sweeter, for the sake of which the brethren lead the religious life under me.

‘And then further, Mahāli, a brother by the complete destruction of the Five Bonds that bind people to this world becomes an inheritor of the highest heavens, there to pass away, thence never to return. That, Mahāli, is a condition higher still and sweeter, for the sake of which the brethren lead the religious life under me.

‘And then further. Mahāli, when a brother by the destruction of the Deadly Floods (or Intoxications—Lusts, Becomings, Delusion, and Ignorance) has, by himself, known and realised and continues to abide here, in this visible world, in that emancipation of mind, that emancipation of heart, which is Arahatship—that, Mahāli, is a condition higher still and sweeter still, for the sake of which the brethren lead the religious life under me.

Another, in Sutta Pitaka Vol 2 : Sutta. Tī. Ma. Mahāparinibbānasuttaṃ:

“Ānanda, the monk Sāḷha, with the ending of effluents, dwelt in the effluent-free awareness-release and discernment-release, having directly known and realized them for himself right in the here-and-now. The nun Nandā, with the ending of the five lower fetters,16 has spontaneously arisen (in the Pure Abodes,) there to be totally unbound, destined never again to return from that world. Sudatta the male lay-follower, with the ending of [the first] three fetters, and with the attenuation of passion, aversion, & delusion, is a once-returner, who—on returning only once more to this world—will put an end to stress. Sujātā the female lay-follower, with the ending of [the first] three fetters, is a stream-winner, never again destined for states of destitution, certain, headed for self-awakening. Kakudha the male lay-follower… Kāraḷimbha… Nikaṭa… Kaṭissaha… Tuṭṭha… Santuṭṭha… Bhaṭa… Subhaṭa the male lay-follower, with the ending of the five lower fetters, have spontaneously arisen (in the Pure Abodes,) there to be totally unbound, destined never again to return from that world.

“Ānanda, more than 50 lay-followers who have died in Nādikā, with the ending of the five lower fetters, have spontaneously arisen (in the Pure Abodes,) there to be totally unbound, destined never again to return from that world. 96 lay-followers who have died in Nādikā, with the ending of [the first] three fetters, and with the attenuation of passion, aversion, & delusion, are once-returners, who—on returning only once more to this world—will put an end to stress. 510 lay-followers who have died in Nādikā, with the ending of [the first] three fetters, are stream-winners, never again destined for states of destitution, certain, headed for self-awakening.

The link, that I gave you, are included pāli version. You can take the keywords from that pāli to search more information.

  • 3
    The OP isn't asking how to search, but is asking whether anyone has already written an index or reference. – ChrisW Sep 4 '18 at 16:51

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.