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Understand that meditation helps to calm one's mind and does it also helps one get less agitated and less affected towards the unnecessary?

What about chanting? Does it also have the same effect?

If one is patient and he/she naturally will not get frustrated easily and not easily irritated by minor stuffs. That does not mean he/she meditated or chanted to achieve such state of mind?

I'm actually asking for myself.

I'm not much of a patience person, short-tempered at times. I don't meditate but i do brief chanting occasionally. I used to do chanting when I was little and looking back, I feel like life was a little better back then and possibly less frustrated, not sure if it has anything to do with chanting.

Growing up, I felt as if life was so injustice and merciless and often got angry at myself and things around me.

Probably I care too much, i'm not sure. Things may not get on somebody else nerve but to me, it was so easy!

At work, at home, my surrounding, everything just seems so tough on me. So I don't know what helps.

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No, chanting does not make you less agitated. on the contrary, chanting makes puthujjanas more agitated and the buddha says it is a mistake for the bikkhus to chant, but the buddha allows ''intonation''.

The problem with chanting is that puthujjanas love to get carried away by the chant and as usual being carried away by the senses is the biggest mistake a puthujjana who wants to stop being unhappy can make. So the bikkhus must avoid that in order for the bikkhus to stop creating suffering for the bikkhu and for and for the audience, so that the puthujjanas are not carried away by their words, which means preventing suffering in lay people. This is how somebody cares for oneself and for others, typically from having metta and doing karuna.

http://obo.genaud.net/dhamma-vinaya/pts/vp/03.cv/vp.03.cv.05.03.horn.pts.htm

Having given reasoned talk, he addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks, there are these five disadvantages to one singing dhamma with a long-drawn plain-song sound:

he is pleased with himself in regard to that sound, and others are pleased in regard to that sound,

and housepeople look down upon,

and while he is himself striving after accuracy in the sound[2] there is an interruption in his concentration,

and people coming after fall into the way of (wrong) views.[3]

These, monks, are the five disadvantages to one singing dhamma with a long-drawn plain-song sound.

Monks, dhamma should not be sung with a long-drawn plain-song sound.

Whoever should (so) sing it, there is an offence of wrong-doing."

Now at that time monks were doubtful about intoning.[4]

They told this matter to the Lord.

He said:

"Monks, I allow intoning."

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If, monks, the covetousness of one who is covetous and who meditates on chants could be got rid of merely by meditating on chants...

Chants are good for memorization, but note that the Satipaṭṭhānasutta (Mindfulness Meditation) is the direct path and relies on breathing aware. To unravel habitual clinging and craving, notice that mindfulness meditation proceeds with great care and without grasping, controlling or rejecting. Breathing aware, we meditate as the body calms, then acknowledge pleasant feelings and unpleasant feelings, letting be, letting go. Read MN10 carefully and practice it mindfully.

🙏

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Reciting is one of the Five Opportunities for Freedom in AN Vimuttāyatanasutta:

  1. with five factors

  2. Opportunities for Freedom

“Mendicants, there are these five opportunities for freedom. If a mendicant stays diligent, keen, and resolute at these times, their mind is freed, their defilements are ended, and they arrive at the supreme sanctuary.

What five? Firstly, the Teacher or a respected spiritual companion teaches Dhamma to a mendicant. That mendicant feels inspired by the meaning and the teaching in that Dhamma, no matter how the Teacher or a respected spiritual companion teaches it. Feeling inspired, joy springs up. Being joyful, rapture springs up. When the mind is full of rapture, the body becomes tranquil. When the body is tranquil, one feels bliss. And when blissful, the mind becomes immersed in samādhi. This is the first opportunity for freedom. If a mendicant stays diligent, keen, and resolute at this time, their mind is freed, their defilements are ended, and they arrive at the supreme sanctuary.

Furthermore, it may be that neither the Teacher nor a respected spiritual companion teaches Dhamma to a mendicant. But the mendicant teaches Dhamma in detail to others as they learned and memorized it. That mendicant feels inspired by the meaning and the teaching in that Dhamma, no matter how they teach it in detail to others as they learned and memorized it. Feeling inspired, joy springs up. Being joyful, rapture springs up. When the mind is full of rapture, the body becomes tranquil. When the body is tranquil, one feels bliss. And when blissful, the mind becomes immersed in samādhi. This is the second opportunity for freedom. …

Furthermore, it may be that neither the Teacher nor … the mendicant teaches Dhamma. But the mendicant recites the teaching in detail as they learned and memorized it. That mendicant feels inspired by the meaning and the teaching in that Dhamma, no matter how they recite it in detail as they learned and memorized it. Feeling inspired, joy springs up. Being joyful, rapture springs up. When the mind is full of rapture, the body becomes tranquil. When the body is tranquil, one feels bliss. And when blissful, the mind becomes immersed in samādhi. This is the third opportunity for freedom. …

Furthermore, it may be that neither the Teacher nor … the mendicant teaches Dhamma … nor does the mendicant recite the teaching. But the mendicant thinks about and considers the teaching in their heart, examining it with the mind as they learned and memorized it. That mendicant feels inspired by the meaning and the teaching in that Dhamma, no matter how they think about and consider it in their heart, examining it with the mind as they learned and memorized it. Feeling inspired, joy springs up. Being joyful, rapture springs up. When the mind is full of rapture, the body becomes tranquil. When the body is tranquil, one feels bliss. And when blissful, the mind becomes immersed in samādhi. This is the fourth opportunity for freedom. …

Furthermore, it may be that neither the Teacher nor … the mendicant teaches Dhamma … nor does the mendicant recite the teaching … or think about it. But a meditation subject as a basis of immersion is properly grasped, attended, borne in mind, and comprehended with wisdom. That mendicant feels inspired by the meaning and the teaching in that Dhamma, no matter how a meditation subject as a basis of immersion is properly grasped, attended, borne in mind, and comprehended with wisdom. Feeling inspired, joy springs up. Being joyful, rapture springs up. When the mind is full of rapture, the body becomes tranquil. When the body is tranquil, one feels bliss. And when blissful, the mind becomes immersed in samādhi. This is the fifth opportunity for freedom. …

These are the five opportunities for freedom. If a mendicant stays diligent, keen, and resolute at these times, their mind is freed, their defilements are ended, and they arrive the supreme sanctuary.”

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