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I recently started attending Karma Kagyu meditations and did the guided Guru Yoga meditation. Is it suitable to be done (with youtube for example) at home or just at Sangha? I feel like I'd like to be doing that more than twice a week.

Is doing it elsewhere technically considered a breach of tradition?

  • Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. – ChrisW Apr 18 '18 at 13:08
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Let me answer this question with one of Milarepas songs:

A yogi, I roam the mountains.

Like a great Mandala, my body is full of bliss.

Cleansed of desires and pride, I feel well and happy.

With longing for diversions extinguished, I feel joy in solitude.
Since I have renounced all things, I am happy in a desolate land.

Since I have cut all ties with kin, getting and saving are not worries.

Happy and joyous do I live ... without plans or schemes.

I want neither fame nor glory. Wherever I stay, whatever I wear or eat, I fell truly content

Also the third Karmapa used to practise in different places from mountain to mountain without a fixed places.Most of the yogis choose a solitary retreat and they rarely return to monasteries.

My native land is all lands, In no particular direction. My monastery is the solitary mountains, In no particular place. My family is all the beings of the six realms.

~ Shabkar

We seek freedom from attachment when you realize that all that appears and exists to be your mind, there is no path of enlightenment apart from that.

As long as there exists a place in Samsara to give us freedom,we aren't truly free!

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Before you go on reading my answer, know I have no familiarity with Karma Kagyu or Guru Yoga meditation.

Is it suitable to be done (with youtube for example) at home or just at Sangha?

I think this entirely depends on what you are trying to get out of it. If you are looking for more time with the effects of doing the meditation, then I would say do them as often and wherever you'd like! If you are looking for a feeling of inclusion in the Sangha or the feelings that go along with being a part of a religious tradition, then I would say just do them at the Sangha.

Is doing it elsewhere technically considered a breach of tradition?

I have no idea whatsoever. That being said, if it is a breach of tradition, for what reason is practice not allowed at home? In a best case scenario, tradition can be helpful in that it may be a reliable way to accomplish something that has lasted through the test of time through its repeated success. Worst case scenario, tradition could be in place just because "it is the way it has always been done" and perhaps could inhibit your practice and slow your process of achieving your goals. Only you though can make that assessment and decide which is true for you, or if the truth lies somewhere in the middle.

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