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The law of cause and effect is unchangeable and we must face the consequences of the Karmas done through body, speech and mind.

However, is it possible to hasten the manifestation of the results of bad deeds so that we can face them and be free. Is there any sutta or any practise that anyone knows that we can do to achieve this?

marked as duplicate by Andrei Volkov Apr 11 '18 at 14:09

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  • I think this is a good question and is not a duplicate. In Buddhism, it is certainly a good idea to "hasten the results of bad deeds." Zen masters would often pray for this. I recommend the Zhunti mantra and any of the classic Buddhist mantras with the intention of purifying one's evil karma. With the Zhunti mantra especially you will have vivid dreams of puking black material when it is working. Be careful. – Ahmed Apr 11 '18 at 14:40
  • I agree with Ahmed. This is not a duplicate of the linked question. – Navneet Nair May 11 '18 at 6:54
  • Study of emptiness also hastens ripening of bad karma and thus expatiates it. Refer to the Diamond Sutra: diamond-sutra.com/read-the-diamond-sutra-here/… – Navneet Nair May 11 '18 at 7:00
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The law of cause and effect is unchangeable and we must face the consequences of the Karmas done through body, speech and mind.

Only the five heinous crimes are guaranteed to manifest their results. According to what I have been told, others need a suitable environment/conditions to manifest at percent/future. But this is not entirely in your control.

Ex:- If you have in the past get involved in fights and beat up people, you would build up karma to eventually get beaten up in a fight. Because it is only natural and fully inline with dependent arising that you will over time keep increasing your abrasive nature and eventually meet your match. However if you stop getting involved in fights, that probability will be greatly reduced. But it is possible that someone from the past who held a grudge against you, plot revenge against you and succeed at a moment that you are weak.

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Accayika Sutta: Urgent suggests you can't hasten the result of practice (i.e. Awakening), but that what you can/should do is desire the condition for its ripening.

The essay Kamma and its Fruit says,

If kammic action were always to bear fruits of invariably the same magnitude, and if modification or annulment of kamma-result were excluded, liberation from the samsaric cycle of suffering would be impossible; for an inexhaustible past would ever throw up new obstructive results of unwholesome kamma.

I think that's saying it's possible for a (bad) deed to have no result, no ripening (though it also warns that it may ripen or is likely to ripen).

So I think that instead of "hasten the manifestation of the results of bad deeds so that we can face them and be free", Buddhism teaches to hasten the practice (the whole Threefold Training), in order to cease fermentations and further becoming, and be free.

  • Do you know of any purification practices we can do to modify or annul bad karma say for a deed we committed in anger and now have remorse for ? – user68706 Mar 28 '18 at 10:41
  • Yes, I know I didn't directly answer your question -- I redirected the question. So far as I know, a purification practice is "confession of fault", "clearly seeing the disadvantage of the transgression", and then "not doing it again" -- and there are others. But, so far as I know, "purification" isn't the same as "hastening the ripening of bad kamma". – ChrisW Mar 28 '18 at 10:46
  • Also, a result of "skilful virtue" is "lack of remorse". So, if you feeling "remorse" now, you are already experiencing some result. – ChrisW Mar 29 '18 at 10:59
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Is there a way to hasten the results of bad deeds?

No, you can't. But if you do good deeds you might be able to reduce the effect of bad deed.

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You have a view similar to that of Jainism, that the Buddha dismissed, that you need to hasten the "burning up" of past karma and stop creating new ones. You can see this in the Devadaha Sutta:

"When this was said, the Niganthas (Jains) said to me, 'Friend, the Nigantha Nataputta (Mahavira) is all-knowing, all-seeing, and claims total knowledge & vision thus: "Whether I am walking or standing, sleeping or awake, knowledge & vision are continuously & continually established in me." He has told us, "Niganthas, there are evil actions that you have done in the past. Exhaust them with these painful austerities. When in the present you are restrained in body, restrained in speech, and restrained in mind, that is the non-doing of evil action for the future. Thus, with the destruction of old actions through asceticism, and with the non-doing of new actions, there will be no flow into the future. With no flow into the future, there is the ending of action. With the ending of action, the ending of stress. With the ending of stress, the ending of feeling. With the ending of feeling, all suffering & stress will be exhausted." We approve of that [teaching], prefer it, and are gratified by it.'

The view of Buddhism is different - please see below. The Buddhist view is not about hastening the "burning up" of past karma or avoiding creation of new karma. Rather, it's about putting an end to dependent origination, through ceasing craving and uprooting the ten fetters. This is done through the Noble Eightfold Path.

The Parable of the Salt Crystal from the Lonaphala Sutta:

"Suppose that a man were to drop a salt crystal into a small amount of water in a cup. What do you think? Would the water in the cup become salty because of the salt crystal, and unfit to drink?"

"Yes, lord. Why is that? There being only a small amount of water in the cup, it would become salty because of the salt crystal, and unfit to drink."

"Now suppose that a man were to drop a salt crystal into the River Ganges. What do you think? Would the water in the River Ganges become salty because of the salt crystal, and unfit to drink?"

"No, lord. Why is that? There being a great mass of water in the River Ganges, it would not become salty because of the salt crystal or unfit to drink."

"In the same way, there is the case where a trifling evil deed done by one individual [the first] takes him to hell; and there is the case where the very same sort of trifling deed done by the other individual is experienced in the here & now, and for the most part barely appears for a moment.

'Now, a trifling evil act done by what sort of individual takes him to hell? There is the case where a certain individual is undeveloped in [contemplating] the body, undeveloped in virtue, undeveloped in mind [i.e., painful feelings can invade the mind and stay there], undeveloped in discernment: restricted, small-hearted, dwelling with suffering. A trifling evil act done by this sort of individual takes him to hell.

'Now, a trifling evil act done by what sort of individual is experienced in the here & now, and for the most part barely appears for a moment? There is the case where a certain individual is developed in [contemplating] the body, developed in virtue, developed in mind [i.e., painful feelings cannot invade the mind and stay there], developed in discernment: unrestricted, large-hearted, dwelling with the immeasurable. A trifling evil act done by this sort of individual is experienced in the here & now, and for the most part barely appears for a moment.

And more explanation in MN36:

"And how is one developed in body and developed in mind? There is the case where a pleasant feeling arises in a well-educated disciple of the noble ones. On being touched by the pleasant feeling, he doesn't become impassioned with pleasure, and is not reduced to being impassioned with pleasure. His pleasant feeling ceases. With the cessation of the pleasant feeling there arises a painful feeling. On being touched with the painful feeling, he doesn't sorrow, grieve, or lament, beat his breast or becomes distraught. When that pleasant feeling had arisen in him, it didn't invade his mind and remain because of his development of the body. When that painful feeling had arisen in him, it didn't invade his mind and remain because of his development of the mind. This is how one is developed in body and developed in mind."

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There is no control of us on mind. It goes on reacting to the stimuluses out of its age old habit. It's the habit itself is the soul of the mind. Vipassana breaks this habit and ultimately dissolution of mind: a condition of no mind.

Because all the sankharas of good and bad deeds are stored in subconscious and there is no control of us on arising of a particular sankhara of good or bad deeds urgently or slowly. However in my opinion a tremendous urge of getting liberated and experiential knowledge of nothingness in the life can trigger ripening and outcropping of these stored sankharas. In hinduism it is called vairagya. This "vairagya" might be also one of the stored sankharas in previous life.

So in this non atheist era, where keeping blind faith is almost impossible, practising vipassana steadily and ardently is the only solution. It's just liking sweeping the garbage, dust of our karmas i.e. sankharas and making the slate clean exhibiting no suffering.

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