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Let's say that a friend asks you if you want to go on a trip with him.

You have a bad feeling about it, your intuition raises a red flag. How do you say no without making up a fake excuse?

When I say "no, thanks for your offer but I don't feel like it." People tend to try to convince me, and I end up having to be cold. I can't realistically say "I appreciate your offer but my intuition tells me that this is a bad idea and I can't explain to you why."

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I can't realistically say "I appreciate your offer but my intuition tells me that this is a bad idea and I can't explain to you why."

If that's what you feel, you should exactly say that. The more you allow yourself to relax and express what you really feel, without fear of judgement, the easier it becomes as you do it again and again, and you arrive at a place in your life when you can be truly yourself and happy, because you will be spontaneously manifesting your own true nature. Just a matter of getting comfortable and free from the grasp of fear and the control of preconceptions, and allowing yourself to be yourself.

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If it's a bad idea and if you are his friend, you should try to convince him not to go too. Explain to him why it is a bad idea. If he listens to you, you would've done him a service as a true friend. If he does not listen, that's his Karma.

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I can't realistically say "I appreciate your offer but my intuition tells me that this is a bad idea and I can't explain to you why."


Pondering your understanding in this particular situation and any subtle intentions or assumptions behind it could reveal a lot of hidden inner truth you might never have seen before.


You could say other things like:

"I know it's weird but these intuitions are trips unto themselves"

"Do you have any ideas why I feel like this?"

"Speaking of trips, have you ever tried meditation?"


I like to believe that the truth should get our respect over our worries about how other people evaluate us.

I like to believe that if our friends have the wrong idea about us in the beginning, in the long run our true friends will realize the right idea about us. - Metta :)

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Truthfully, you don’t owe an explanation. There is no obligation. If asked, then yes, be clear on what the issue is or simply use something generic like “it’s a personal issue” or the like. If he is a true friend, there should already be a level of respect.

All the best.

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