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This time when the controller of the breath disappears thoughts too disappear cittarupa stop by presenting a line across and the top of it there is a picture of a person. After a minute breath appeared. And there was no observer too at that time. What is the meaning of the cittarupa which appeared and what is the stage?

  • I don't know stages, but the mind presents images when it does not have words for what it experiences, or when discursive thought is not operating. The image might be meaningful, or random. – user2341 Dec 18 '17 at 13:25
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    It's kinda like an orgasm. If you have to ask, you probably didn't have one. Keep at it! – user698 Dec 18 '17 at 14:54
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    What observed this? Did you lose consciousness? – Lowbrow Dec 18 '17 at 15:27
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    My first teacher always said, don't worry about stages. Thinking about stages is bad for your progress. – Andrei Volkov Dec 18 '17 at 18:44
  • In a session last week, Ronald McDonald hung himself. Naturally, I hesitate at deducing meaning from this. In fact, this has been my approach for images in meditation for two years. I once saw a beautiful 3 dimensional image of the Buddha sat on a white elephant. My friend said this was auspicious - I wasn't interested. Just carry on. – user14148 Oct 2 '18 at 22:01
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You can find some advice from Ajaan Fuang on this page:

§ When Ajaan Fuang taught meditation, he didn't like to map things out in advance. As soon as he had explained the beginning steps, he'd have the student start sitting right in his presence, and then take the steps back home to work on there. If anything came up in the course of the practice, he'd explain how to deal with it and then go on to the next step.

Once a layman who had known more than his share of meditation teachers came to discuss the Dhamma with Ajaan Fuang, asking him many questions of an advanced nature as a way of testing his level of attainment. Ajaan Fuang asked him in return, "Have you had these experiences in your own meditation yet?"

"No, not yet."

"Then in that case I'd rather not discuss them, because if we discuss them when they're not yet a reality for you, they'll just be theories, and not the real Dhamma."

§ One meditator noticed that his practice under Ajaan Fuang was making quick progress, and so he asked what the next step would be. "I'm not going to tell you," Ajaan Fuang said. "Otherwise you'll become the sort of amazing marvel who knows everything before he meets with it, and masters everything before he's tried his hand. Just keep practicing and you'll find out on your own."

§ "You can't plan the way your practice is going to go. The mind has its own steps and stages, and you have to let the practice follow in line with them. That's the only way you'll get genuine results. Otherwise you'll turn into a half-baked arahant."

§ "Don't make a journal of your meditation experiences. If you do, you'll start meditating in order to have this or that thing happen, so that you can write it down in your journal. And as a result, you'll end up with nothing but the things you've fabricated."

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When you meditate you can see weird visions of many kinds, unless you make them intentionally for meditative purposes like attaining some jhana ala Visudhimagga style or as in MN 128 Upakkilesa Sutta - Imperfections, you should not attach to them much significance in general. This i say based on teachings on imperfections of insight.

You should remember what is happening to the body imagination, postures, behavior, feelings & sensations. If you are going to discern some other things you should focus on these or others from Satipatthana Sutta that i did not mention here:

... [1] "There is the case where a monk remains focused on mental qualities in & of themselves with reference to the five hindrances. And how does a monk remain focused on mental qualities in & of themselves with reference to the five hindrances? There is the case where, there being sensual desire present within, a monk discerns that 'There is sensual desire present within me.' Or, there being no sensual desire present within, he discerns that 'There is no sensual desire present within me.' He discerns how there is the arising of unarisen sensual desire. And he discerns how there is the abandoning of sensual desire once it has arisen. And he discerns how there is no future arising of sensual desire that has been abandoned. (The same formula is repeated for the remaining hindrances: ill will, sloth & drowsiness, restlessness & anxiety, and uncertainty.)

...

... ...

[4] "Furthermore, the monk remains focused on mental qualities in & of themselves with reference to the seven factors for Awakening. And how does he remain focused on mental qualities in & of themselves with reference to the seven factors for Awakening? There is the case where, there being mindfulness as a factor for Awakening present within, he discerns that 'Mindfulness as a factor for Awakening is present within me.' Or, there being no mindfulness as a factor for Awakening present within, he discerns that 'Mindfulness as a factor for Awakening is not present within me.' He discerns how there is the arising of unarisen mindfulness as a factor for Awakening. And he discerns how there is the culmination of the development of mindfulness as a factor for Awakening once it has arisen. (The same formula is repeated for the remaining factors for Awakening: analysis of qualities, persistence, rapture, serenity, concentration, & equanimity.) ...

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