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  • Helpful: Is an idea of being helpful, such an intent, a secure attribut of skilful action?

  • Can intention of being helpful be very unskilful? Thinking on mercy-killing, or taking away dirt, which in unknowenly actually the food of the person one thought to help.

  • What is helpful? What might be right resolve, intent, leading a helpful and skilful act?

  • Does a helpful act always benefits both, or just one of giver and receiver, or how should it be understood?

An illustration might be helpful: The compassioned monkey.

[Note: This is a gift of Dhamma and not meant for commercial purpose or other low wordily gains by means of trade and exchange.]

  • 1
    Why would someone ask rhetorical questions on a Q&A site? – Andrei Volkov Nov 8 '17 at 14:36
  • To help? To wait for Andreis reaction? Because bored? Not sure. Is Andrei in such cases? Why did he ask suggestive? – Samana Johann Nov 8 '17 at 14:50
  • When I said to one of my teachers that I wanted to help other people, her response was, "There are no other people." So I would say that asking: is this action skillful for me? has the same misunderstanding. – user2341 Nov 9 '17 at 13:00
  • Seems to be a great fool, this teacher. Take a stick and beat her. When she starts to blame, tell her there are no people. @nocomprende . Pointless when such people teach, those "helpers"... – Samana Johann Nov 10 '17 at 5:50
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Can intention of being helpful be very unskilful?

Yes, if the intention is based in one of the three unwholesome roots; greed, hatred, delusion.

Does a helpful act always benefits both, or just one of giver and receiver, or how should it be understood?

Regarding the giving of food, the Buddha taught that its beneficial for both giver and reciever.

In the Suppavāsā Sutta (the Gift of Food), the Buddha gave the following teaching to the Koliyan Lady Suppavāsā;

"Suppavāsā, a noble female disciple, by giving food, gives four things to those who receive it. What four? She gives long life, beauty, happiness, and strength. By giving long life, she herself will be endowed with long life, human or divine. By giving beauty, she herself will be endowed with beauty, human or divine. By giving happiness, she herself will be endowed with happiness, human or divine. By giving strength, she herself will be endowed with strength, human or divine. A noble female disciple, by giving food, gives those four things to those who receive it".

-- AN 4:57; II 62–63, Bodhi trans

  • That would mean someone giving "just" answers becomes answers. Is that right? Good applyed for that case, or open to misunderstandings? Thinking on raising pigs for example. – Samana Johann Nov 8 '17 at 14:53
  • @Bhante. I've updated the answer to include the situation where one gives food. – Lanka Nov 8 '17 at 17:11
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    There's one koan that sprung in my mind when reading "the Gift of Food" - "The Giver Should Be Thankful". – Dalv Olan Nov 8 '17 at 20:41
  • Nurishment, the Buddha taught, is the reason for suffering. So how does that work together? It all misses intent, it all misses objectiv. Again. Whats the kamma of a pig keeper? What's the matter with all wealth dis-ease? As supportive food, the compassioned monkey came to mind. – Samana Johann Nov 8 '17 at 23:34

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