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Forgive me if I write many questions in a single post, but these all deal with the thematic of attachment. I hope to quit my addictions to pleasures, in major part social media, by gaining insight through these.

  1. What are Buddhist ways to deal with attachment to entertainment? (And in this context, aside from deleting the social media account).

  2. Is it better to tackle this problem as

    • stemming mainly from attachment to pleasure in itself
    • or to tackle it as a question of a specific pleasure, i.e. social media?
  3. How does diminution of the activity work best? Namely, should one

    • quit immediately
    • or quit in increments? If by increments, how does one proceed?
  4. Does multitasking or combining sources of pleasure -- e.g. listening to music and chatting, or chatting and watching a movie -- intensify the detrimental effect? How so?

  5. Would engaging in a single activity at a time, without multitasking or distractions, deter one from the pleasurable activities? In other words, does mindfulness diminish attachment?

  6. Should one try to engage in replacement activities, or should one actively diminish the addiction? In other words, should one find substitute activities to engage in first, or is abstaining from media more important?

Thank you.

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What do we do depends on what we know and feel as meaningful.

If we have meaningful things to do, and some things know and feel as rather meaningless, then the correct choice comes naturally.

Due to habits we might lack awareness and we might dwell in habits. Then by regulating our priorities we can change our activities.

We can think of it as finding our wholeness, or "true self".

An illusory self is entangled in activities, conditions, attachments, submissions etc. "True self" is never there.

Think of it as not a real object, not a theoretical notion. Finding "true self" means the experiential discovery of the freedom.

There is nobody who could be attached. All things and their meanings are here, now.

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  1. What are Buddhist ways to deal with attachment to entertainment? (And in this context, aside from deleting the social media account).

Buddhism teaches pleasure or pleasant feelings is something important. The giving up of sensual pleasures (such as entertainment) generally occurs when the limitations of those sensual pleasures are clearly seen thus the quest arises for an alternative source of pleasure, such as the pleasure of Dhamma.

  1. Is it better to tackle this problem as
    • stemming mainly from attachment to pleasure in itself
    • or to tackle it as a question of a specific pleasure, i.e. social media?

It depends on how unwholesome the pleasure is because some pleasures are more unwholesome (i.e., with more negative side effects) than others.

  1. How does diminution of the activity work best? Namely, should one
    • quit immediately
    • or quit in increments? If by increments, how does one proceed?

Although it occurred before I found Buddhism & meditation, when I gave up gross sensual pleasures, I still relied on more wholesome sensual pleasures, such as more wholesome music & a very wholesome physical activity (body surfing). Therefore, using more wholesome sensual pleasures can help in giving up more unwholesome sensual pleasures.

  1. Does multitasking or combining sources of pleasure -- e.g. listening to music and chatting, or chatting and watching a movie -- intensify the detrimental effect? How so?

Multitasking does not sound meditative.

  1. Would engaging in a single activity at a time, without multitasking or distractions, deter one from the pleasurable activities? In other words, does mindfulness diminish attachment?

It is important to feel pleasure, including from meditation. That is why the Buddhist practises include generosity, harmlessness & loving-kindness as things that bring spiritual pleasure. I think what is important is the quality or wholesomeness of activities.

  1. Should one try to engage in replacement activities, or should one actively diminish the addiction? In other words, should one find substitute activities to engage in first, or is abstaining from media more important?

Meditation is a substitute activity however if transitioning to meditation is too extreme then, yes, replacement/substitute activities are beneficial & important. What is important is the wholesomeness of the activities. For example, doing a good charitable deed can bring happiness & inner contentment that lasts. Deeply knowing we do not harm ourself or others also brings a happiness that lasts. Or visiting Dhamma centres & meeting Dhamma people can bring happiness.

  • I think I gather -- and now agree -- that pleasure is essential, but of a wholesome kind. You have a great answer. I still wonder, then, if you would classify social media as wholesome? – Eggman Nov 7 '17 at 12:07
  • Thanks Eggman. I do not really know what social media is. I had a Facebook for a short time but this was not really entertainment for me but more became a social obligation, which I ended (having to say a bunch of "thank yous" to some old friends I hadn't talked to for 30 years). – Dhammadhatu Nov 7 '17 at 20:14
  • FYI I think "social media" are media (e.g. web sites) whose content is primarily created by the public: so for example it includes Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn, but also reddit, YouTube, and (less famously) any StackExchange sites and Discourse sites (including e.g. the forum on SuttaCentral), and even Wikipedia too, also DhammaWiki and so on. – ChrisW Nov 9 '17 at 9:46

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