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I have read much about meditation and stress and anxiety, but I'd like to have an experiential perspective from people on here.

1) What's the Buddhist view about stress? What are the solutions to stress? [I don't mean suffering as in dukkha but the physiological reaction of stress linked with cortisol, or just the feeling of being stressed.]

2) Same thing, but with anxiety.

3) How much are stress and anxiety, or their exacerbation, barriers to spiritual practice?

Thank you.

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How much are stress and anxiety, or their exacerbation, barriers to spiritual practice?

Stress can be broken up into mental and physical phenomena such as thoughts, emotions, muscle tension, pain etc. They are just impersonal phenomena arising and ceasing on their own accord.

Anxiety is a variation of the 4th Hindrance of restlessness and worry (uddhacca-kukkucca). The hindrances are barriers that block one from progressing on the Path, unless one practices to understand and overcome them.

In Vipassana meditation one treats all objects the same. No object is more or less important than the previous or next object.

Just note the phenomena a couple of times and return attention to the abdomen (Burmese Method).

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They are prerequisites: seeing "suffering/stresd" as it is, outwardly, and then inwardly reflected, or inwardly and being aware. Which causes "anxity", seeing no possibility to escape. (samvega)

Having come accross a seldom birth as human (possible not stupid...) and access in meeting the Dhamma, remembering it, if heared/read, if known, faith , or called pasada gives way.

Again the Depending Co-Cessation:

Upanisa Sutta: Prerequisites

birth has becoming as its prerequisite, stress & suffering have birth as their prerequisite, conviction has stress & suffering as its prerequisite, joy has conviction as its prerequisite, rapture has joy as its prerequisite, serenity has rapture as its prerequisite, pleasure has serenity as its prerequisite, concentration has pleasure as its prerequisite, knowledge & vision of things as they actually are present has concentration as its prerequisite, disenchantment has knowledge & vision of things as they actually are present as its prerequisite, dispassion has disenchantment as its prerequisite, release has dispassion as its prerequisite, knowledge of ending has release as its prerequisite.

See also: Affirming the Truths of the Heart: The Buddhist Teachings on Samvega & Pasada

But since one possible still seeks refuge in an next birth, another question, or hopes that with end of this birth suffering will have be disappeard, does neither came in contact with the Dhamma of the Experiant one, the unexceled Trainer of those ready to be taimed, or his following discioles, or is by hindrences not capable to reflect not foolish what has been said, suffering and anxity might arise again, and a gain, followed by death and anothers question birth, and in the case that there is no suffering and anxity, to develop right view, since it will come, would be wise.

  • What's the Buddhist view about stress? What are the solutions to stress? [I don't mean suffering as in dukkha but the physiological reaction of stress linked with cortisol, or just the feeling of being stressed.]

Dukkha is Dukkha. Feeling of stress are all three kind, caused by not-knowing.

pañcavaggiyakathā

(Mv.I.6.19) [14] “Now this, monks, is the noble truth of stress: Birth is stressful, aging is stressful, death is stressful; sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair are stressful; association with the unbeloved is stressful, separation from the loved is stressful, not getting what is wanted is stressful. In short, the five clinging-aggregates are stressful.

(Mv.I.6.20) “And this, monks, is the noble truth of the origination of stress: the craving that makes for further becoming—accompanied by passion & delight, relishing now here & now there—i.e., craving for sensual pleasure, craving for becoming, craving for non-becoming.

(Mv.I.6.23) [15] “Vision arose, insight arose, discernment arose, knowledge arose, illumination arose within me with regard to things never heard before: ‘This is the noble truth of stress.’

“… ‘This noble truth of stress is to be comprehended.

“Vision arose, insight arose, discernment arose, knowledge arose, illumination arose within me with regard to things never heard before: ‘ … has been comprehended.’

  • Same thing, but with anxiety.

Dame ss for Dhukka: why anxity?

  • How much are stress and anxiety, or their exacerbation, barriers to spiritual practice?

In as far one has a unfortune rebirth: not meeting, listening/hearing, reflecting, comprehending the Dhamma: therefor not developing the path.

Or if not seen Dhukkha, having heard...comprehended the dhamma, hoping when death or real fear approches to remembering it, the known Dhamma.

Still no fear? Still no suffering? Or still not read, reflected, comprehend the good Dhamma? Just await here the next birth in an another answer then. Some like to make merits and that gives possibilities for those with faith in it.

  • Meditations for Stress and Anxiety e.g. support of developing samvega

-- Reflection on death

-- Reflectikn on the (parts) of the body

-- Reflection on (one of the 10) corpse

-- Reflexion on the uglyness of food

Best possible to see suffering if one leaves the palace, the secure home and inspects the world outside a little: hospitals, cemeteries, slayer halls... might be possible near.

Or reflective listening to certain lyrics of Iron Maiden, Metallica... reflective, not singing, delight in sound and stressed bang the head...

[Note: This is a gift of Dhamma and not meant for commercial purpose or other low wordily gains by means of trade and exchange.]

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