1

In the Kevatta Sutta, Buddha is explaining to Kevatta why he doesn't use miraculous powers for his teaching. And while telling about psychic power he tells:

Then the person without faith, without conviction, would say to the person with faith and with conviction: 'Sir, there is a charm called the Gandhari charm by which the monk wielded manifold psychic powers...exercising influence with his body even as far as the Brahma worlds.'

And while telling about telepathic power Buddha says:

"Then the person without faith, without conviction, would say to the person with faith and with conviction: 'Sir, there is a charm called the Manika charm by which the monk read the minds...of other beings...' What do you think, Kevatta -- isn't that what the man without faith, without conviction, would say to the man with faith and with conviction?" "Yes, venerable sir, that's just what he would say."

So it seems that it is possible to gain psychic power through Gandhari charm and mind reading power through Manika charm. I want to know what these charms are. Are they Mantras? Do any Buddhist scriptures describe it? I'm well aware that Buddhist scripture do not focus in attaining these powers and Buddhism is related with ending of suffering.

But as those charm names are spoken by Buddha himself, maybe it's possible to get knowledge about those charms. Also if there is some ancient commentaries of Kevatta Sutta, then maybe some information is avaliable there.

1

Gandhari charm = psychic power of heretic jhāna attained person, who is called "isi" in Gandhara district.

Manika charm = telepathic power of heretic jhāna attained person, who is called "isi" in Manika district.

charm=power, there is nothing difference.

Source: Kevaṭṭasutta Commentary.

1

Gandhari Charm and Manika Charm are skills of greater powers of the will and wish that have been not seen since the time of the Buddha. After that period some rishis and vidyadharas have tried to research into them and having failed to find the original form, they invented occultic versions of them.

1

The sutta exemplifies how a wordling would interpret miraculous powers of a monk, by saying that it was not the monk who did it by his concentrated mind but he used charm X.

Now the wordling wants some quick fix charm and not work on his silā and samādhi.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.