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I have seen certain suttas where the Buddha explains about the qualities of monks who are and who are not worthy of gifts, salutation and etc.

Where can I find the Suttas? References are appreciated.

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From the Ajañña Sutta (AN 8.13):

"In the same way, a monk endowed with eight qualities is worthy of gifts, worthy of hospitality, worthy of offerings, worthy of respect, an incomparable field of merit for the world. Which eight?

(1) "There is the case where a monk is virtuous. He dwells restrained in accordance with the Patimokkha, consummate in his behavior & sphere of activity. He trains himself, having undertaken the training rules, seeing danger in the slightest faults.

(2) "When given food, whether coarse or refined, he eats it carefully, without complaining.

(3) "He feels disgust at bodily misconduct, verbal misconduct, mental misconduct, at the development of evil, unskillful [mental] qualities.

(4) "He is composed & easy to live with, and doesn't harass the other monks.

(5) "Whatever tricks or deceits or wiles or subterfuges he has, he shows them as they actually are to the Teacher or to his knowledgeable companions in the holy life, so that the Teacher or his knowledgeable companions in the holy life can try to straighten them out.

(6) "When in training he gives rise to the thought, 'Whether the other monks want to train or not, I'll train here.'

(7) "When going, he goes the straight path; here the straight path is this: right view, right resolve, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, right concentration.

(8) "He dwells with his persistence aroused, [thinking,] 'Gladly would I let the flesh & blood in my body dry up, leaving just the skin, tendons, & bones, but if I have not attained what can be reached through human steadfastness, human persistence, human striving, there will be no relaxing my persistence.'"

From the Ajaniya Sutta (AN 3.94) - please read sutta for elaboration:

"In the same way, a monk endowed with these three qualities is worthy of gifts, worthy of hospitality, worthy of offerings, worthy of respect, an unexcelled field of merit for the world. Which three? There is the case where a monk is consummate in beauty, consummate in strength, and consummate in speed.

From the Akkhama Sutta (AN 5.139) - please read sutta for elaboration:

"In the same way, a monk endowed with five qualities is not deserving of gifts, deserving of hospitality, deserving of offerings, deserving of respect, nor is he an unexcelled field of merit for the world. Which five? There is the case where a monk is not resilient to sights, not resilient to sounds, not resilient to aromas, not resilient to flavors, not resilient to tactile sensations.

"In the same way, a monk endowed with five qualities is deserving of gifts, deserving of hospitality, deserving of offerings, deserving of respect, an unexcelled field of merit for the world. Which five? There is the case where a monk is resilient to sights, resilient to sounds, resilient to aromas, resilient to flavors, resilient to tactile sensations.

From the Sotar Sutta (AN 5.140) - please read sutta for elaboration:

"In the same way, a monk endowed with five qualities is deserving of gifts, deserving of hospitality, deserving of offerings, deserving of respect, an unexcelled field of merit for the world. Which five? There is the case where a monk is a listener, a destroyer, a protector, an endurer, and a goer.

From the Pathama Atthapuggala Sutta (AN 8.59):

Monks, there are these eight individuals who are worthy of gifts, worthy of hospitality, worthy of offerings, worthy of reverential salutation, the unsurpassed field of merit for the world. Which eight?

The one who has entered the stream, the one who has entered upon the course for the realization of the fruit of stream-entry, the once-returner, the one who has entered upon the course for the realization of the fruit of once-returning, the non-returner, the one who has entered upon the course for the realization of the fruit of non-returning, the arahant, the one who has entered upon the course for arahantship.

  • Also, Ratana sutta called Sangha Ratana (sangha is worthy like a gem). See sangha unseat I katha in path of purification for more detail. – Bonn Sep 30 '17 at 7:06
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Akila Hettiarachchi, and those interested,

It's general dangerous to approach topics of who "deserves my goodness" and questions are always better put in a way "how am I worthy of goodness I receive", "how do I best give back the goodness received", and in this manner the most teachings on who is worthy of special gifts are put by the Buddha to his disciples: to urge them to practice well.

For a householder it is difficult, most impossible to know who is a person count as the unexceled field of merits, which is maybe best shown in the Paṭisalla Sutta

One may find some useful hints in regard of giving alms, which counts for reverence similar under the answers to [Q&A] Details on what may be given as alms (Tips for alms-giving)

A warning: Be careful of that what ruins a fool who having gained knowledge! He/she might think in ways like: "The monks must... His duty is... so and so he should receive..." Having gained much knowledge about possible duties of others, not really know practice and as it really is, and forgetting on focussing on wn mindstate, which is the A&O of all here, one makes nothing then demerits, distroys his goodness, with every act one believes to make merits at least. Generosity that is path-supportive requires not only wisdom but also right view. A normal person or even a fool is not able to go or came as even far as this.

So it's general good to be more positive "selfish" and think about ones own duties and good states of mind. The kamma of the receiver is at least his/her and you, especially as householder, are not obligated to take on the rule of police or judge, yet it is at the same moment good and importand to judge of who is a worthy receiver of special gifts and reverence, and that is maybe an importand point, since every being is worthy of the share and giving of the four requisites (food, shelter, cloth, medicine) in need an there are proper times for such.

On the matter of the importand judgement one may find an extended discussion after some basic and importand teachings on giving here: Dana (Generosity, Charity) "Abhidhamma in daily life "

A very good and importand question, Ta Ron raised, since it is broadly not so good understood and especially within the group of people who already have faith in the benefit of Dana an see even reason why such is good made, it is always a topic, Ta Ron, and my person explains this again and again...

To often one with dicerment can see that especially literary learned people, but without having it really practiced to understand, if they are fools, simply destroy all there goodness (past merits), when ever they learn more, since they use everything to give their defilements (here stinginess) excuses and ground to stay so.

Of two people, one good literary informed, but lacking on genuine goodness, and another person, even lacking totally on literary knowledge, but with genuine goodness, the secound can not only be expected doing further undertakings for accumulation of merits, but also that he/she successes in it, while it is not sure for the first to even start to try.

In regard of reverence and respect, one may find tips and reverences here: Respect and Veneration

Given that:

VERSE 108: In this world, one may make sacrificial offerings, great and small, all the year round [to ordinary people], in order to gain merit; all these offerings are not worth a quarter of the merit gained by worshipping the Noble Ones (Ariyas) who walk the right path.

It's good to practice in areas where such can be susbected, and its most importand to do such on places where people have joy in giving and sharing merits, rather to see good deeds and joy with it as a tabu and childish. Something that is of course not easy not find in modern sociaties.

It's all, incl. the skill of giving, a matter of right view, and associating inwardly and outwardly with it.

A matter that is how ever not spoken of, is also how monks, in this case, are paying gratitude to given special food and it should be a warn sign, if people approach with "all is anicca"

I was talking recently to someone who had given a gift to a lay-run meditation center last year. He came back this year to find that it disappeared. When he asked the people at the center about this they said: "Well, that's impermanence."... Sensitivity through generosity

And the best way to learn things is: Better to Give than to Consume. So if one gives time and effort and goes through all given links and reverences, with respect and gratitude, one can espect to gain really good understanding of the matter of judging of what is worthy and will find out that there is no way than to eager strive by means of giving to become worthy of gifts by oneself and represent one self in the way one has received the goodness of others.

From collection of reverences on Dana:

This was said by the Blessed One, said by the Arahant, so I have heard: "I am a brahman, responsive to requests, open-handed, bearing my last body, an unsurpassed doctor & surgeon. You are my children, my sons, born from my mouth, born of the Dhamma, created by the Dhamma, heirs to the Dhamma, not heirs in material things.

"There are these two kinds of gifts: a gift of material things & a gift of the Dhamma. Of the two, this is supreme: a gift of the Dhamma.

"There are these two kinds of sharing: sharing of material things & sharing of the Dhamma. Of the two, this is supreme: sharing of the Dhamma.

"There are these two kinds of assistance: assistance with material things & assistance with the Dhamma. Of the two, this is supreme: help with the Dhamma.

"There are these two kinds of mass-donations: a mass-donation of material things & a mass-donation of the Dhamma. Of the two, this is supreme: a mass-donation of the Dhamma."

He who, unstinting,

made the mass-donation of Dhamma,

the Tathagata,

sympathetic to all beings:

to one of that sort

— the best of beings, human & divine —

living beings pay homage —

to one gone

to the beyond

of becoming.

Genuine spiritual teachings

May all who are able to rejoice with the merits done here, access highest fruits, and may the Devas inform those who did not heard or seen it yet.

Anumodana!

[Note: This is a gift of Dhamma, not meant for commercial purpose or other wordily gains.]

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