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All phenomenon are nonself then who achieves the Nirvana?

marked as duplicate by ruben2020, Dhammadhatu, Crab Bucket, user3293056, Community Sep 13 '17 at 6:18

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  • May be it is a duplicate. – Dheeraj Verma Sep 13 '17 at 1:50
  • The mind (citta) finds & abides in Nibbana, similar to when taking medicine from a doctor, the physical body (rather than a 'self') gets well. Its like having a baby. Sperm & ovum make a baby rather than a two selves ('husband' & 'wife'). Its like when food is digested by intestines (rather than by a self). Regards – Dhammadhatu Sep 13 '17 at 2:28
  • Mind is the whole creation. – Dheeraj Verma Sep 13 '17 at 2:32
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Your question is invalid. If all phenomena are non-self you cannot ask "what self achieves the phenomenon called Nibbana".

Prince Siddharta attained Nibbana and became the Buddha. But that is a statement in conventional reality. When you say "all phenomena are non-self", it is a statement in ultimate reality. Do not try to mix up the 2 paradigms. Either you speak in ultimate reality or conventional reality. Pick one at a time.

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    Nirvana is not a phenomenon. You mean to say that I can not say Siddhartha Gautama attained Nirvana. If Siddhartha Gautama did not attain nirvana then how should I rephrase the question ? – Dheeraj Verma Sep 13 '17 at 5:42
  • @DheerajVerma you could look at The Aggi-Vacchagotta Sutta, again, and maybe phrase the question in terms of passing away – user3293056 Sep 13 '17 at 5:53
  • All realities are phenomena. I think you are confusing phenomena with formations(conditioned phenomena) – Sankha Kulathantille Sep 13 '17 at 6:26
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And suppose someone were to ask you, 'This fire that has gone out in front of you, in which direction from here has it gone? East? West? North? Or south?' Thus asked, how would you reply?

I suppose I can read your question in two ways:

  1. The Buddha (or arhat) is like the fire, dependent on causes and conditions. When it has gone out, what has gone out?

  2. What does the Buddha (or arhat) depend upon, that has been "uprooted"?

I think the answer to 2 is form feeling sensation, etc., and the answer to 1, what is put out when nirvana or final nirvana is reached, is conditioned existence, or maybe suffering, or dependent phenomena, or ignorance. It probably depends on your framework.

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