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I guess I have no craving left for the existence except for food and water.

Will I be reindividualised after death?

Should I give up the desire for food and water in order to stop my rebirth?

5

Will I be reindividualised after death?

Perhaps the answer depends on whether you are "individualized" now?

In this answer, Yuttadhammo Bhikkhu wrote (emphasis mine),

I've talked about the subject before myself, and the conclusion I make is that it's not that Buddhists believe in rebirth, it's that we don't believe in death - the latter being merely a concept referring to the change from one set of experiences to another. True death only occurs either at every moment or at the experience of nibbana.

In any case, as useful as rebirth may be in reminding us of what's really at stake in our dhamma practice, far more useful is an understanding of the present moment, something that really has little to do with past or future lives.

I don't know which Buddhist school you're asking about, but I think that according to the Four stages of enlightenment in Theravada Buddhism, you should expect to abandon "identity view" or "self-view" at the first stage of enlightenment (stream entry) ... and "conceit", "material-rebirth desire", and "immaterial-rebirth desire" (and ignorance and restlessness) only at the last stage.

I asked about some of these concepts/topics here:


Should I give up the desire for food and water in order to stop my rebirth?

The Bhikkhuni Sutta (which may be intended for not-yet-enlightened people) says,

'This body, sister, comes into being through food. And yet it is by relying on food that food is to be abandoned.'

Thus was it said. And in reference to what was it said? There is the case, sister, where a monk, considering it thoughtfully, takes food — not playfully, nor for intoxication, nor for putting on bulk, nor for beautification — but simply for the survival & continuance of this body, for ending its afflictions, for the support of the holy life, [thinking,]

'Thus will I destroy old feelings [of hunger] and not create new feelings [from overeating]. I will maintain myself, be blameless, & live in comfort.'

Then he eventually abandons food, having relied on food.

'This body, sister, comes into being through food. And yet it is by relying on food that food is to be abandoned.'

Thus was it said, and in reference to this was it said.

Note too that there are different kinds of "desire": for example, unvirtuous craving, and a more virtuous desire for liberation -- see, for example, How to develop Chanda?

2

"Will I be reindividualised after death?"

If craving is present, you will.

If craving is not present, you will not.

"Should I give up the desire for food and water in order to stop my rebirth?"

The aspirant who has liberated himself from all cravings should easily answer such a question.

Why is this so?

The aspirant, who is liberated from all craving, is liberated from future rebirth by knowing the cause of his future rebirth.

Knowing the cause, he removes the cause, thus liberating himself from future rebirth.

What do you think is the cause?

If you think the cause is the desire for food and water, either you missed something or your question is missing something.

  • Bad deeds (Karma) are the cause of rebirth. And also craving (Upadana) is the cause of the rebirth. Suppose my karma is very good but I have some cravings left then I again will have to take rebirth after death. Therefore cravings like food craving can also result in rebirth... – Dheeraj Verma Aug 31 '17 at 13:31
  • Something is missing. Firstly, there is ignorance. Then, because of ignorance, craving arises. Then, because of the arise of craving, body and mind and senses arise. Because of body/mind/senses, good and/or bad deeds arise. Thus, the cause is ignorance. What do you think? Is a desire for eating and drinking a good deed or a bad deed? If this desire is fueled by craving (a consequence of ignorance), then it is a bad deed and rebirth will not be stopped. If it is fueled by compassion (a consequence of extinction of ignorance), then it is a good deed and rebirth has potential to stop. – beginner Aug 31 '17 at 14:25
  • I think the real question you should ask yourself is, why do you want to give up the desire for food and water? Is it out of compassion for other beings? If yes, explain how you're being compassionate by not eating and drinking? What's your situation? – beginner Aug 31 '17 at 14:25
  • I guess I understood it now. I thought every craving indiscriminately causes rebirth. When Nagasena was asked the same question by king Milinda then Nagasena said I will be reindividualized if any cravings are left in me. I think the answer would be to eat moderately and not to have any lust towards the food. – Dheeraj Verma Aug 31 '17 at 14:53
  • I think you were equating "desire" with "craving" and/or vice-versa. These two can't be equated, because they are two different things. When desires are present in a being but are not poisoned with craving, rebirth will stop. On the other hand, when desires are present in a being and are poisoned with craving, rebirth will probably not stop, because at the time of death, that being will probably not be able to realize the truth in order for all craving in him to get extinct. Nagasena was correct. I agree, eating and drinking moderately is a wise decision. – beginner Aug 31 '17 at 16:39
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According to Buddhist teaching, you will be re-born until you attain Arahantship. According to Buddhist teaching, Arahant consumes food in moderation until there Parinibbna.

  • Is Buddhist Arahantship different from Hindu Arahantship ? People follow different religions. Are the people of different religions doomed forever for not knowing the Buddhist teachings? – Dheeraj Verma Aug 31 '17 at 13:36
  • no, they are not. Buddhist teachings make life manageable, but they dont control your fate. Your consciousness can either drift back into the ether of the all or if uncleared of karmic influence it will be obliged to migrate to another shell with a similar "flavor" so to speak. I dont know the answers there yet. But meditation actually clears the "karmic influence" of the micro-tubules of brain cells. These are the quantum-level probabilities and choices that our lives have left over at our death and they keep our consciousness from re-entering the whole. – Kauva Aatma Aug 31 '17 at 21:08

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