4

Similarly, wise consideration of the mental liberation of loving kindness (mettā- cetovimutti) counteracts ill will; wise consideration of the elements of effort (ārambhadhātu), exertion (nikkamadhātu), and striving (parakkamadhātu) counteracts sloth and torpor; wise consideration of tranquility (cetaso vūpasama) counteracts restlessness and worry; and wise consideration of wholesome and unwholesome states (kusalākusaladhammā) counteracts doubt.6

So lets say i am having ill will thoughts. Do i just replace those thoughts with loving kindness instead?

Or if I am experiencing sloth and torpor, do i just replace and abandon those thoughts with exertion and striving?

Is that how you apply this passage in the real world, by abandoning those thoughts and having one pointed focus on their antidotes?

  • "So let's say I am having ill will thoughts do i just replace those thoughts with loving kindness instead?" I would say yes. But it is not easy to just do this. How I practice this is by seen impermanence, suffering and not-self in other beings. – SarathW Jul 7 '17 at 22:20
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    I've tried to give a title to this which summarises the question so it can be search for. Please edit or revert if I have misunderstood – Crab Bucket Jul 8 '17 at 8:09
  • I understand crab hmm what would a good title be? – DeusIIXII Jul 10 '17 at 1:46
6

So lets say i am having ill will thoughts do i just replace those thoughts with loving kindness instead? Or if im experiencing sloth and torpor, do i just replace and abandon those thoughts with exertion and striving?

Yes, that would be one way of dealing with the hindrances. This is the first method. If that does not work, one moves on to the second method and so forth. Methods are described below.


One can deal with each of the 5 hindrances in 5 ways, i.e. the following 5 methods works for all of the hindrances.

Methods are found in The Noble Eightfold Path, p. 63-66, by Ven. Bhikkhu Bodhi.

  1. Replacing the hindrance with its opposite, e.g. replacing hatred/ill-will with thoughts of loving-kindness.
  2. Contemplating the arisen hindrance as vile and ignoble, since it has entered the mind without permission or any control.
  3. Shifting attention away from the hindrance.
  4. Shifting attention onto the hindrance and thoroughly contemplating it by investigating its causes and conditions for arising together with its characteristics.
  5. Removing the hindrance with force, just as a strong man would pin a weaker man to the ground.

No. 5 should only be used if method 1-4 does not work.

If you have any questions to what I wrote feel free to ask.

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    This can be read in MN 20: suttacentral.net/en/mn20 – Dhammadhatu Jul 8 '17 at 8:30
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    No that was perfect thank you. I find number 3 works best for me. But i didn't even know there was other methods – DeusIIXII Jul 10 '17 at 1:42
  • I don't really know if the list above is meant to be done chronologically. By my experience (I think this can be generalized), if one feels strong negative emotions one needs to cool off first, because one's mind is distorted and filters out information ->If one is happy for example, negativity is filtered out. So I think distracting oneself and/or watching it curiously is a good way. Also reflecting on the drawbacks can be helpful, but only prior or after the emotional disturbance. Whenever you are emotionaly disturbed, don't use reason. Be compassionate+accept experience+"cool yourself off". – Val Mar 26 '18 at 13:42

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