1

What are the Buddhist references which deal with:

  • space and
  • time

Primary sources from the Tripitaka or secondary and tertiary sources with proper citations are also welcome.

  • Time in Buddhism – ChrisW Jun 29 '17 at 11:48
  • Above question is not a reference request so the answers do not have a list of references. This is more specific to get references. Also I did not know this was there when I asked. – Suminda Sirinath S. Dharmasena Jun 29 '17 at 12:01
3

The Sutta that I referred to in my earlier comment was:

(S.22.46.) Dutiya-aniccasuttam

  1. Savatthinidanam. “Rupam, bhikkhave, aniccam. Yadaniccam tam dukkham; yam dukkham tadanatta; yadanatta tam ‘netam mama, nesohamasmi, na meso atta’ti evametam yathabhutam sammappabbaya datthabbam. Vedana anicca…sabba anicca…savkhara anicca…vibbanam aniccam. Yadaniccam tam dukkham; yam dukkham tadanatta; yadanatta tam ‘netam mama, nesohamasmi, na meso atta’ti evametam yathabhutam sammappabbaya datthabbam’.

“Evametam (CS:pg.2.38) yathabhutam sammappabbaya passato pubbantanuditthiyo na honti. Pubbantanuditthinam asati, (S.22.46./III,46.) aparantanuditthiyo na honti. Aparantanuditthinam asati, thamaso § paramaso na hoti. Thamase § paramase asati rupasmim…vedanaya sabbaya…savkharesu…vibbanasmim cittam virajjati vimuccati anupadaya asavehi. Vimuttatta thitam. Thitatta santusitam. Santusitatta na paritassati. Aparitassam paccattabbeva parinibbayati. ‘Khina jati, vusitam brahmacariyam

Thus seeing it as it is with correct wisdom, the views about the prior limit do not become, the views about the prior limit not being, the views about the posterior limit do not become, the views about the posterior limit not being, obstinate misconstruing does not become, obstinate misconstruing not being, his mind turns away from form, feeling, notion, volitional compositions, consciousness, and is liberated from the cankers by not grasping.

(Evam etam yathabhutam sammappaññaya passato pubbantanuditthiyo na honti, pubbantanuditthinam asati aparantanuditthiyo na honti, aparantanuditthinam asati thamaso paramaso na hoti, thamase paramase asati rupasmim vedanaya saññaya sankharesu viññanasmim cittam virajjati vimuccati anupadaya asavehi).

"But, Kaccana, let the past be, let the future be (titthatu pubbanto titthatu aparanto, literally: let the prior limit be, let the posterior limit be). Let there come an intelligent man, guileless, honest, straight, and I instruct him, if he follows my instruction, he will before long know by himself, see by himself." MN, II, 44 (80), MA, 209, 787b-c.

The above Pali "titthatu pubbanto titthatu aparanto" (literally: let the prior limit be, let the posterior limit be) can also be understood as: put down the past, put down the future, drop the past, drop the future, leave them alone, don't touch them. The Buddhist path is unloading, whereas all concerns about the past and future are loading. So to put down all those extraneous concerns and to concentrate on meditation is how views, frameworks or whatever else can be set aside temporarily, until they can be set aside definitively, with no remainder, at arhatship.

The Buddhist ideal is to leave the past and the future to themselves and live strictly in the present instead. The Buddha is told of the monk Sthaviraka who dwells alone (eka-vihari), has him called up and tells him: When the past is cut, the future is let go of, and lust and passion (chanda-raga) for present existential states (atta-bhava-patilabha) are well controlled, then the dwelling alone is perfect in details. SN, II, 283 (21, 10), SA, 1071, 278.

Whether rebirth is factually true or not, it is not a matter of concern to the Buddhist cultivator, who would rather shed past and future and pay attention to what happens in the present.

  • There's another English translation here: suttacentral.net/en/sn22.46 – ChrisW Jun 29 '17 at 18:16
  • @ChrisW, it would be more beneficial if you see things this way... “Bhikkhus, Form, Feeling, Perception, Volitional formations, Consciousness… cannot be maintained to one’s satisfaction in the long run (anicca). What cannot be maintained to one’s satisfaction in the long run makes us distraught (dukkha). As we are truly helpless in the long run, nothing is with any real substance in the end (anatta). What is Anatta should be seen with correct wisdom thus: “with no refuge” or “without essence”. 60 -80 of us will contemplate this way in the next 30 days. – Saptha Visuddhi Jun 29 '17 at 19:52

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