4

New to the idea of getting external help, too. I have several questions about this path after read this Q&A:

What attracted me to buddhism was

  • Meditation: Practice it many times on Padmasana because I thought that was the unique meditation form. Then I knew I can meditate over a skateboard, too.
  • Mindfulness: Dreaming about achieving it.
  • Hatha Yoga: Practiced it many times.
  • Ninjutsu: Practiced it several months on Bujinkan Dojo school (not a recommendation to go there). The concepts I got from Japanese culture were great though. They are attached to Buddhism but I think they misimpreted the message.
  • Kriya yoga: Autobiography of a yogi.

Some of my greater achievements:

  • Leave drugs
  • Leave alcohol
  • Became vegan
  • Practiced a lot in the non-attachment in objects and people too.

These questions are general, mine are more precise. Please be open minded about my questions, they are very real.

  • Was Buddha an artist of our times? Edit: I know a lot of teachers, I don't know any monks I can remember.

    • What's special about Buddha?
    • Why should someone follow him?
    • I see this like being someone else. Is this a bad concept about Buddhism?
    • Why he has in fist sight all the answers?
  • I read that is some kind of comparison about Buddhism schools and Cristians religions, but I learned that Buddhism is not a religion but a lifestyle. Is it or not?

  • About Yin and Yang, is that part of Buddhism?
  • The 12 universal laws are part of Buddhism?

That's all for the moment. Oh, I forgot, the most important one: About this little part of me you could read, is there a school recommendation?

Thanks for reading.

  • Welcome to the site. There's something I don't understand, about the question, could you explain it: what is "an artist of our times"? What is "an artist" and what is "of our times"? An obvious/superficial reply could be, "No, the Buddha was a teacher and ... like a monk, who lived about 2400 years ago"; but I'm not sure whether that's what you're asking. – ChrisW Dec 8 '16 at 4:31
  • i'll edit that question. – Germán Acosta Dec 8 '16 at 4:42
  • Hello Germán and welcome to Buddhism SE. We also have a Help Center with useful resources. Enjoy your time here. – Lanka Dec 8 '16 at 18:45
  • Thanks @Lanka, I will ! I didn't know about that Help Center link. I'll definetly check it when the time comes. – Germán Acosta Dec 8 '16 at 21:29
  • Books and other written material can be helpful, but they can also be misleading, especially if you're new to Buddhism. Buddhism is a practice, the best way to learn about Buddhism is to do a retreat at a monastery or other practice centre. – user10515 Dec 18 '16 at 15:58
6

Some quick answers, which I may add to later:

  • Buddhism is certainly not a religion because it states all of its teachings are to be known & verified by its wise followers. It is certainly a way of life, which leads away from suffering to peace. Buddha defined it as the 'holy way of life'.

  • Buddha is the most special individual human being because history shows he was the first to fully & truly diagnose what suffering really is and, more importantly, the methods to overcome suffering. Although today there are many religions & disciplines incorporating direct or indirect principles of the Buddha to overcome suffering, the Buddha was the 1st to fully diagnose suffering & its solution.

  • The Buddha actually does have all of the answers to all important questions. The teachings of the Buddha cover all facets of life, including money, work, relationships, human behaviour, meditation & spiritual wisdom that overcomes suffering. However, as the saying goes: "When the student is ready, the teacher will appear". To test the Buddha, we can ask questions about different things and a well-educated Buddhist can offer answers from the Buddha. By asking questions, we can learn how wise the Buddha was.

  • Buddhism is not the same as Christianity because Buddhism holds everything is just natural elements (dhatu) where as Christianity believes in God. However, Christianity does share some principles with Buddhism about charity, morality, love, non-violence & some aspects of mental development. But Christianity does not explicitly teach the higher wisdom of Buddhism, such as the four noble truths, three-characteristics, not-self (anatta), emptiness (sunnata), the elements (dhatu), etc.

  • Buddhism is very straightforward, extremely thorough in its analysis and the language used is literal. Where as Christianity can often be very vague and the language used is often metaphorical. Jesus himself said he taught in parables to hide his teachings from certain people.

  • Ying & yang is not really related to Buddhism because ying & yang is a principle that explains the creation of natural things where as Buddhism is about ending suffering (rather than natural creation). However, some ying & yang principles are found in Buddhism, such as in its description of male & female faculties & it is description of the vicissitudes of life. While the psychology of Buddhism certainly explains ying & yang principles pertaining to the cyclical relationship between pleasure, craving & suffering, the goal of Buddhism is to transcend or be beyond ying & yang (rather than to embrace or celebrate ying & yang).

  • Similar to ying & yang, the 12 laws of the universe are mostly about creationism & therefore not related to the liberative purpose of Buddhism (although Buddhism would agree with some of them but not all). For example, since Buddhism transcends 'self', the idea of 'we reap what we sow' is not central to Buddhism, although it does exist in Buddhism. This idea is only morality for worldly people that believe they are a 'self' & believe 'they personally' reap & sow.

  • As for being an "artist of our times", most of the world still must advance towards the spiritual evolution of the Buddha. Buddhism states the way/path of the Buddha is "timeless" (akaliko). As long as beings or minds exist that can experience suffering, the way/path of the Buddha will properly address such suffering.

  • Finally, about 'schools of Buddhism', this depends on your disposition. i.e., the Law of Attraction. The Buddha taught individuals of different dispositions are attracted to different teachers with different emphasis. The general distinctions between Buddhism schools are:

    (1) Helping oneself versus helping others.

    (2) Individual self-reliant practice versus teacher lead

    (3) One present life focus versus reincarnation/rebirth focus.

  • This answers are really helpful to me. I'll be great if you could answer the questions left. This are doubts I carry long time ago. – Germán Acosta Dec 8 '16 at 21:38
  • OK..........done – Dhammadhatu Dec 9 '16 at 5:24
1

Artist Buddha?

The Buddha denounces individual expression and passion in favor of being grounded in peace and happiness.

How to get to Nirvana?

Follow the Buddha's Eightfold Path to cultivate an ability to let go of everything you want to pull to you(greed, clinging, desire) and develop acceptance of reality you normally push away(anger, aversion).

Yin Yang is a Taoism concept but it was remixed into Mahayana Buddhism.

What's special apout the Buddha?

He is appropriately ordinary and fully enlightened. He developed special teachings that arn't seen in any other religions like Anatta and the 12 links of Dependant Origination.

  • Thanks for your time, still there is lack of answers and I dont like your tone on the first answer, regards. – Germán Acosta Dec 9 '16 at 17:44
  • I don't know, I suppose I couldn't come up with a good answer for all the questions. I appreciate the comments. I will try to do better next time :) – Lowbrow Dec 10 '16 at 4:17
1

A few comments on Dhammadhatu's excellent answer, for now mostly pertaining to "Is Buddhism a religion?" and "Does Buddhism answer important questions?

First, it is correct to say that Buddhism is not a religion. However, I believe that

  • It is absolutely not the case that Buddhists are atheists.

  • It is probably not the case that Buddhists are agnostics in the Western sense.

Many Buddhist artworks of Ancient India depict the Buddha teaching various Hindu deities. While Hindus considered this blasphemy, the artists were making an important point; whether or not the Hindu gods (or any Gods) exist, they cannot be a source of "ultimate knowledge". If all things and beings are arising and perishing (and therefore cannot access "ultimate knowledge"), then either Gods are somehow "not things or beings" (special pleading, and leads to problems of causal efficacy) or they are also arising and perishing, and therefore have no access to "ultimate knowledge". But, since Buddha teaches that the only "ultimate knowledge" is "arising and perishing" now all gods (Hindu included) will have to learn from him! So, to return to the matter at hand, in fact Buddhists do not think that the existence or non-existence of God/Gods is an "Important Question (r)(tm)"!

Second, when Dhammadhatu says "Buddhism answers important questions", the word "important" must be exceedingly carefully used and interpreted. Questions regarding any "soul" and "afterlife" are mostly regarded as unimportant. Also, questions regarding the origin of the universe and the end of the universe, origin of man, etc. are almost totally dismissed. For greater detail, see this. In my not-so-humble opinion this is the most important part of Buddhism and gets short shrift in the literature; wiki: parable of the poisoned arrow

EDIT: I retract my statement that Buddhism is not a religion, because I was using a wrong definition of religion. See here; https://area51.meta.stackexchange.com/questions/8236/isnt-buddhism-a-religion. I do not insist that it is or is not a religion. Probably this is an "unimportant question"! =P

  • So Buddhism is not metaphysical but physical-practical? This is really interesting. – Germán Acosta Dec 10 '16 at 8:11
  • @Jamesson. I generally edit out references to my posts made by other members however since I fully agree with your comments, I will thank you instead. That said, my answer is strictly my view & slightly extreme or "core" Buddhism. Kind regards. – Dhammadhatu Dec 10 '16 at 11:55
  • @GermánAcosta. well, the way one of my teachers put it - not metaphysics, meta-psychcics. "Supra-normal" phenomena exist, but they come from humans, not god(s). – jamesson Dec 12 '16 at 19:52
0

What is "samsara"?

  • samsara is , according to buddhism , all the living beings (not only humans and animals , there are lot of other living things in this univers according to buddhism ) are having a rebirth after death .everytime a living being dies he will be reborn,( where you going to born next will be decided on several facts, I will talk about that later.) samsara means all the lives that a living being will have till he finds the nirvana.

What is Nirvana ?

  • Nirvana is a state of mind where you no longer have any kind of attachment to anything, not even to yourself , not even to nirvana itself, SO when someone achieve this state of mind he will not born again in another life , that is the end of his 'samsara'.

Who is Buddha ?

  • Buddha was the first person to achieve Nirvana. the first person to stop the samsara from happening . As his teaching all the sadness starts with birth . If one is able to stop the birth , he will be able to end all the sadness, that means achieving nirvana.

P.S. I will add things to this answer soon ,

  • Hello and welcome to Buddhism SE. I noticed you have spelled Samsara with an "n", i.e. "Sansara" numerous of times. Is that an error? I'm not familiar with that kind of spelling of the word. – Lanka Dec 10 '16 at 17:45
  • @Lanka Thank you . I edited . Actually I didn't know the correct word. – theModerator713 Dec 10 '16 at 17:51
  • @Lanka and theModerator713: Actually, it appears to be a valid variation. puredhamma.net/key-dhamma-concepts-that-have-been-hidden/… – Lowbrow Dec 10 '16 at 17:53
  • @Uuu yeah In Sri Lanka , We call it "sansara" with a 'n'. – theModerator713 Dec 10 '16 at 17:57
  • Thanks for the info. If you use that word and its a valid variation then you do not need to edit your post. I just never heard that variation before thats why I asked. Enjoy your time here. – Lanka Dec 10 '16 at 18:01

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.