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There's an enlightened buddhist figure I remember reading about a year or two ago, but I am failing completely to search him up. I would like to find his name and story again, could you help me identify him? These are the details I remember:

  • He was enlightened (I think), and the head of a monastery.
  • He was known to say quite profound things (of course!), but forbade anyone from writing down what he said.
  • A couple of his disciples thus resorted to wearing paper robes and carrying ink with them, so that when they were within earshot of him and heard him say something impressive, they could write it down immediately.
  • He was quite angry at people who wrote down what he said in his presence. I remember reading he once chased a disciple out of his meeting room in fury, shouting "You'd sell me if you could!".
  • I think books/scrolls were sold of his teachings by those disciples; which is what frustrated him (it seems he was concerned some people were only there to make money by doing this) and is what compelled him to forbid people to write down what he said and chase that person out.
  • I think he may have been from Japan.

This man contrasts very well with one popular image of enlightenment (outwardly serene, all the time, and completely unable to be messed with in any way) and I would like to show this to a friend who might be struggling with unrealistic self-expectations in their path to enlightenment.

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Yúnmén Wényǎn (862 or 864 – 949 CE), (雲門文偃; Japanese: うんもんぶんえん, Ummon Bun'en; also known in English as "Unmon", "Ummon Daishi", "Ummon Zenji"), was a major[a] Chinese Zen master in Tang-era China. He was a dharma-heir of Xuefeng Yicun

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unfortunately i can't answer your question

but

He was quite angry at people who quoted him. I remember reading he once chased a disciple out of his meeting room in fury, shouting "You'd sell me if you could!"

not an 'enlightened' behavior if you ask me

This man contrasts very well with one popular image of enlightenment (outwardly serene, all the time, and completely unable to be messed with in any way) and I would like to show this to a friend who might be struggling with unrealistic self-expectations in their path to enlightenment.

if we talk Buddhadhamma there should be no unrealistic expectations, since qualities of an awakened state are pretty much known in advance being described in the Buddhist scriptures

besides, one cannot know for certain that the said teacher was indeed 'enlightened', especially considering his obvious attachmment to the way his teaching is treated and propensity to anger, and so adducing him for the argument in favor of an alternative form of 'enlightened' demeanor could be misleading and not necessarily convincing

  • not an 'enlightened' behavior if you ask me -- The OP is asking for the opposite, i.e. for an example/story which "contrasts very well with one popular image of enlightenment (outwardly serene..." – ChrisW Aug 31 '16 at 7:57
  • my response is to THIS There's an enlightened buddhist figure... He was enlightened (I think), and the OP asks for help in finding the story of this very teacher who he thinks WAS enlightened, but whos behavior stands in contrast with the 'enlightened' one, which for me is a sufficient prove for him NOT being enlightened, so read my response in this vein, i just wasn't being blunt... he does not ask for the opposite – Баян Купи-ка Aug 31 '16 at 8:13
  • the OP assumes or believes the teacher was enlightened, then asserts contrast in behavior, but there's really no contrast if the premise is that he was NOT enlightened, because acting this way he was most certainly not – Баян Купи-ка Aug 31 '16 at 9:04
  • That's a conventional viewpoint/assumption, e.g. at the end of this answer, "It is much easier to tell whether someone is unenlightened, because if they get angry, greedy or deluded, you can be sure they are not enlightened." – ChrisW Aug 31 '16 at 9:43
  • for me not only it is conventional, it is also correct – Баян Купи-ка Aug 31 '16 at 9:49

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