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I'm thinking that the presence itself, in sense objects, of ignorance, the first link, is never erased; that with final nirvana something has being, the absence of the 12 links. Can the absence of causation itself be present like sense objects are, in absolutely any Buddhist philosophy?

Or is that silly, like saying that the there exists the non existence of a crow's teeth?

  • If you want to learn more about existence/non-existence you should read about non duality where buddhist philosophy dives into the idea of neither existence nor non-existence. – Hugh Aug 7 '16 at 20:05
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    The ideas of existence (atthitañceva) & non-existence (natthitañca) are both 'self-views' although often not translated as such (per SN 12.15) but sometimes translated as such (per SN 12.17, Iti 49, etc). 'Existence' means "I exist and will continue to exist' and 'non-existence' means "I do not exist & I will cease to exist". Both contain "I" belief. Neither existence nor non-existence merely means no self-view (per SN 12.15). Neither existence (atthitañceva) & non-existence is about physical things. – Dhammadhatu Aug 7 '16 at 20:19
  • @Dhammadhatu so there's no "existence" without "self existence"? – user3293056 Aug 8 '16 at 8:48
  • There is but that is not really the subject of suffering & liberation but can be interesting philosophy. Regards – Dhammadhatu Aug 8 '16 at 11:09
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In Buddhism, there are many kinds of causation. See this link about the five 'niyama' or 'laws of causation' (physical, biological, mental, moral & dhamma/spiritual).

The twelve links are the conditions leading to suffering; the cessation of which leads to Nirvana. They are 'dhamma niyama' or 'spiritual causation'. The twelve links are not mental causation (citta niyama).

Therefore, sense objects can be experienced without ignorance because mere sense objects (which are mental causation) are not suffering in themselves.

The only absence of causation is Nirvana, when the twelve links stop creating suffering.

As for the other four kinds of causation, they keep rolling on (unless human life becomes extinct, which would make extinct moral causation & leave three laws of causation).

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When you ponder, weigh, and compare the teachings of the Buddha, you have to base it on adopting the right attitude and asking the right questions about them. AN 2.25 points out that some of the teachings are meant to have their meaning inferred, whereas others are not. Only a Stream Entrant will be able to see this difference. So you and I have a way to go.

If everything is impermanent and transitory, how can there be anything be present or absolute? Because all things are thus conditioned and transient (anicca), they have no real independent identity (anatta) so do not truly ‘exist’, though to ordinary deluded minds this appears to be the case. Simply stated Dependent Origination can be said as,
With this as condition, That arises. With this NOT as condition, That does NOT arise.

This "Coming to be, and Ceasing to be" is happening all the time. All phenomena are subject to this unending interaction. And since all phenomena are dependent on other phenomena, they are all transient and impermanent. Avidyā the first condition.

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Can the absence of causation itself be present like sense objects are, in absolutely any Buddhist philosophy?

There is only one this arisen by casue - Nirvana. Everything else is asien due to a case. Sense objects, sense faculties and contact and the sensation that follows are also arise by cause. Sense faculties cease when you are in Nirvana.

with final nirvana something has being, the absence of the 12 links.

Nirvana is when you break out of the vicious cycle so it cannot be part of the dependent origination.

I'm thinking that the presence itself, in sense objects, of ignorance, the first link, is never erased;

As long as you do not understand the 4 Noble Truths. You have Ignorance. This asies at the point of contact. When you contact an object you feel a sensation and perceive the object not inline with its true nature and react with craving or aversion. How to break Ignorance at this point is to be aware of the true nature (arising and passing) of the experience keeping you mind firmly equanimous.

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