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I'm looking for two suttas:

(1) a sutta in which the Buddha says, I believe, that one is able to perceive the beautiful as ugly and the ugly as beautiful, along with other pairs that one can perceive in the way opposite to what is natural.

(2) A sutta in which the Buddha says that you shouldn't judge others since only he or one like him knows the full extent of people's kamma. I believe it is from the long discourses.

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(1) a sutta in which the Buddha says, I believe, that one is able to perceive the beautiful as ugly and the ugly as beautiful, along with other pairs that one can perceive in the way opposite to what is natural.

I am not sure if there is Sutta which mentions this but the following does have something like what you mentioned above which is called the 5 perception (pañca saññā) which appear in Metta,sahagata Sutta (quotation below), Indriya Bhāvanā Sutta, Tikandaki Sutta, etc.

(1) If he wishes thus, ‘May I dwell perceiving the repulsive in the unrepulsive,’ he dwells perceiving the repulsive therein. (2) If he wishes thus, ‘May I dwell perceiving the unrepulsive in the repulsive,’ he dwells perceiving the unrepulsive therein. (3) If he wishes thus, ‘May I dwell perceiving the repulsive in the unrepulsive and in the repulsive,’ he dwells perceiving the repulsive therein. (4) If he wishes thus, ‘May I dwell perceiving the unrepulsive in the repulsive and in the unrepulsive,’ he dwells perceiving the unrepulsive therein. (5) If he wishes thus, ‘May I dwell rejecting both the unrepulsive and the repulsive, and dwell in equanimity, mindful and fully aware,’ he dwells therein equanimously, mindful and fully aware.


(2) A sutta in which the Buddha says that you shouldn't judge others since only he or one like him knows the full extent of people's kamma. I believe it is from the long discourses.

Acinteyya Sutta mentions karmma is unfathomable thence thinking and trying to read too much into it is futile for a person who is not a Buddha. I think what is said is that you should not judge the working of Karma.

The result of karma, bhikshus, is unthinkable [beyond thought], should not be thought about, thinking about which would bring one a share of madness or vexation.

Following are some Suttas which mentions judging other:

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    Thanks, Suminda. The first one is just what I was looking for but the second is different; the sutta I refer to is not about trying to figure out karma, it's about passing moral judgment on others. – Adamokkha Feb 18 '16 at 19:34
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We find the below and similar pairs in the Tikandika Sutta (A 5.144)

“It is good, bhikshus, that one were to dwell from time to time perceiving the repulsive in the unrepulsive"

In the Maha kamma vibhanga sutta we find the Buddha describing the complexities of kamma and to an extent admonishes from making categorical claims about the effects of kamma.

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A sutta in which the Buddha says that you shouldn't judge others since only he or one like him knows the full extent of people's kamma. I believe it is from the long discourses.

Intention matters. The Dhammapada gives 2 seemingly contradicting messages but they actually aren't as long as we keep intention in mind:

Dhp 76-77: Regard him as one who points out treasure, the wise one who seeing your faults rebukes you. Stay with this sort of sage. For the one who stays with a sage of this sort, things get better, not worse. Let him admonish, instruct, deflect you away from poor manners. To the good, he's endearing; to the bad, he's not.

Dhp 252-253: Easily seen is the fault of others, but one's own fault is difficult to see. Like chaff one winnows another's faults, but hides one's own, even as a crafty fowler hides behind sham branches. He who seeks another's faults, who is ever censorious — his cankers grow. He is far from destruction of the cankers.

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AN 4.246 How to Judge a Person’s Character

AN 6:44 Don’t Judge Others!

  • Thank you, Dhammadhatu, AN 6:44 is what I was looking for. The link is broken, though, so I'll post the text below. – Adamokkha Sep 12 '18 at 21:50
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I found it thanks to Dhammadhatu's answer:

“Therefore, Ānanda, do not be judgmental regarding people. Do not pass judgment on people. Those who pass judgment on people harm themselves. I alone, or one like me, may pass judgment on people."

Bhikkhu Bodhi. The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha (Kindle Locations 19187-19188). Wisdom Publications. AN 6:44.

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