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There are many repetitions of categorization of the different worlds in the Pali Canon that make me a bit confused.

I'm not trying to rationalize them as metaphorical or as a "later addition to the scriptures". I am also not searching for a confirmation. The universe is probably endless and we percept only a tiny fraction of waves coming to our ape senses. There could be myriads of other planes and beings that are present but undetectable with any human-made tools and observable only by an enlightened mind.

But why did he even bother to start on this topic? He wisely answered with Noble Silence to other existential questions that could bring additional disputes and disagreements (like the Buddhist cosmology does today in "Buddhism vs. Scientific Worldview" debate despite scientists allow themselves to make up concepts like "Boltzmann brain" or "multiverse" without any issues).

And then there is this strict distinction between these worlds although they are not even "real realms" but a flow of dependently originated events. Like we're saying "human world" and "animal world" but in the modern eyes they are not even separate.

So what am I missing? Why the Buddha couldn't reduce it to "bad karma leads to hellish worlds, good karma leads to heavenly worlds" but went for this detailed naming and descriptions of beings, deities living there?

closed as primarily opinion-based by Andrei Volkov Jan 7 '16 at 0:49

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    No one can really know why Buddha did what he did or said what he said, so any answers to this question are necessarily going to be opinion-based. Maybe you can rephrase the question to ask, what role does the teaching about the realms play in the bigger system of Dharma? – Andrei Volkov Jan 7 '16 at 0:51
  • Yes, that's basically the same question. I don't understand the point and importance of the detailed descriptions. – user5716 Jan 7 '16 at 4:16
  • @AndreiVolkov I updated the title and removed the opinion part. – user5716 Jan 7 '16 at 4:34
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    A realm is defined by the quality of experience. Typically there is a being and a perceived environment. The beings and their environments share the same ultimate nature, but on the relative level based on one's conduct, one shall "travel through" different realms of experience. All that can be known experientially is known by a Buddha. If you could travel at ludicrous speed through all your previous lifetimes and report back on the patterns/tendencies/routes you observed, you would also know the multitude of realms. They are, however, as variegated as the colors of the rainbow. – sova Jan 7 '16 at 6:17
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    Also, please read about the Bhavacakra or Wheel of Existence. Samsara means "spinning." May freedom blossom in your heart. – sova Jan 7 '16 at 6:18
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Mr Ivan ("god is merciful"), because the Buddha did not like Mr Ivan to mistake an realm of existence for Nibbana, or the heartwood. That is why he described those states of being in detail. So when you start to travel, and do not just ponder why you should not travel yet, Mr Ivan is well prepared.

In which plane of existence did you now take place? Nobody aside of Mr Ivan would know that, does Mr. Ivan do?

(Note: this answer has not been given with the agreement to be means of trade or the purpose of/for trade and/or keep people trapped and bound. How you handle it lies in your sphere, but does not excuse the deed here either.)

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So what am I missing? Why the Buddha couldn't reduce it to "bad karma leads to hellish worlds, good karma leads to heavenly worlds" but went for this detailed naming and descriptions of beings, deities living there?

Well, the Teaching wouldn't be complete if the Buddha just provided only a bird's-eye view to everything. There're the bird's-eye view, worm's-eye view, view from 10,000 feet, or close-up view. One cannot use a microscope to view the stars and galaxies nor use a telescope to view bacterias and viruses. Similarly, to teach math to small kids, one would use arithmetics; for college kids, calculus; and for grad students, topology..