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My niece has very wrinkled palms and a Buddhist man all dressed in orange took her little 6 year old hand and told her it was a very special thing to have. He told her that her palms showed she was carrying her 11th soul and lessons of life had been learnt and she would be wise as she grew older and have an inner peace.

I have been trying to find some more information about this, has anyone else hear of this before?

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    he was trying to sow good seeds :) If you water them well they will grow into wisdom and inner peace, as predicted.
    – Andriy Volkov
    Oct 15, 2015 at 13:32
  • Agreed. I get a little annoyed when people think that Buddhism is this monolithic, vacuumed sealed entity and that all monks must therefore be perfect representations of it. The monk was probably recounting something from his culture...a little folksy nicety that people share from time to time. It would be no different than an American monk saying "that one's got big calves! He's going to be a great leader!" (That is a thing, ps. Hah!) He was very obviously trying sow some good seeds.with the child - nothing more.
    – user698
    Oct 15, 2015 at 17:16

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It doesn't sound anything like Buddhism. A Buddhist monk violates a Vinaya rule, if he touches a girl or woman, regardless of age or relationship, but Buddhist monks aren't the only ones who wear yellow clothing.

Anyways, it sounds like he was simply trying to say something magical to make the child feel fascinated. Most of us like to hear someone saying something special about us to feel good, depending on a body feature or some other external factor. Instead, we should examine our mind states to see if we really have the wholesome qualities praised by the wise.

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  • It also doesn't sound anything like Buddhism because of the "11th soul" (LOL to self).
    – Ahmed
    Oct 15, 2015 at 6:15
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If the man was indeed a Buddhist monk, then he is one of negligible virtue and likely of little merits. Esoteric utterance from such individuals should be noted for what it is.

A wise meritorious monk with good virtues and a cultivated mind would not abase himself to palmistry regardless of cause. In fact unless an answer is relevant and beneficial to your development - he might not even provide you with a response to some of the questions you direct towards him.

DN11

"Whereas some brahmans and contemplatives, living off food given in faith, maintain themselves by wrong livelihood, by such lowly arts as:

reading marks on the limbs [e.g., palmistry];
reading omens and signs;
interpreting celestial events [falling stars, comets];
interpreting dreams;
reading marks on the body [e.g., phrenology];
reading marks on cloth gnawed by mice;
offering fire oblations, oblations from a ladle, oblations of husks, rice powder, rice grains, ghee, and oil;
offering oblations from the mouth;
offering blood-sacrifices;
making predictions based on the fingertips;
geomancy;
laying demons in a cemetery;
placing spells on spirits;
reciting house-protection charms;
snake charming, poison-lore, scorpion-lore, rat-lore, bird-lore, crow-lore;
fortune-telling based on visions;
giving protective charms;
interpreting the calls of birds and animals —

he abstains from wrong livelihood, from lowly arts such as these.

"Whereas some brahmans and contemplatives, living off food given in faith, maintain themselves by wrong livelihood, by such lowly arts as: determining lucky and unlucky gems, garments, staffs, swords, spears, arrows, bows, and other weapons; women, boys, girls, male slaves, female slaves; elephants, horses, buffaloes, bulls, cows, goats, rams, fowl, quails, lizards, long-eared rodents, tortoises, and other animals — he abstains from wrong livelihood, from lowly arts such as these.

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