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As per the answer given to this question, AN 3.87 was cited as such:

...Having undertaken the training rules, he trains in them. With the utter destruction of three fetters, he is a seven-times-at-most attainer who, after roaming and wandering on among devas and humans seven times at most, makes an end of suffering;

With the utter destruction of three fetters, he is a family-to-family attainer who, after roaming and wandering on among good families two or three times, makes an end of suffering;

With the utter destruction of three fetters, he is a one-seed attainer who, after being reborn once more in human existence, makes an end of suffering.

I'm not able to find an English translation of this sutta online, but the individual who posted this said that the third individual described, a "one-seeder", is actually not a Sakadagami, but an Ekabiji, the highest degree of Sotapanna? And the first two are lower degrees of Sotapanna. Does anyone have any insight into this? I was unaware that there were varying degrees of stream-winners. Thank you.

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    It's not a classification I've heard either, but the Theravada canon is mostly untranslated and therefore inaccessible to me. Since I'm not a theorist or representative of any tradition, I find the Zen attitude of no labels, total acceptance of whatever is in the now, a more useful approach for my practice, else, I run the danger of intellectualizing my understanding by reading theory I may never have full access too. When even arhats are shown to have vastly different qualities, like in the rhinoceros sutta versus bodhisatta attitudes found elsewhere, I suspect srotapannas differ much too. – Buddho Sep 6 '15 at 5:05
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This is indeed the standard categorization of sotāpanna in the Theravada. The Puggala-paññatti gives definitions for ekabījī and sakadāgāmī:

  1. katamo ca puggalo ekabījī? idhekacco puggalo tiṇṇaṃ saṃyojanānaṃ parikkhayā sotāpanno hoti avinipātadhammo niyato sambodhiparāyano. so ekaṃyeva mānusakaṃ bhavaṃ nibbattetvā dukkhassantaṃ karoti — ayaṃ vuccati puggalo “ekabījī”.

  2. katamo ca puggalo sakadāgāmī? idhekacco puggalo tiṇṇaṃ saṃyojanānaṃ parikkhayā rāgadosamohānaṃ tanuttā sakadāgāmī hoti, sakideva imaṃ lokaṃ āgantvā dukkhassantaṃ karoti — ayaṃ vuccati puggalo “sakadāgāmī”.

The ostensible difference is twofold:

  1. ekabījī have not reduced rāga, dosa, or moha beyond breaking the first three fetters. sakadāgāmī have reduced the defilements beyond simply breaking the first three fetters. I guess the meaning is that whereas some sotāpanna will indeed only be born one more time, the reason for it isn't due to their lack of defilements that would allow them to be born a second time. Other circumstances will lead them to enlightenment in the next life, I think is the meaning.

  2. ekabījī are said to be born again (only?) as humans, which seems a bit strange; sakadāgāmī are just "come again to this world", which means maybe as an angel, maybe as a human, maybe as a god, I guess.

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I'm not able to find an English translation of this sutta online

It's referenced as (or, at least, that list is also quoted in) AN 3.86 Sekhin Sutta on access to insight.

A few other reference numbers (which I can't chase but which you may be able to) are given in the PTS dictionary definition for Eka says,

bījin having only one (more) seed, i. e. destined to be reborn only once S v.205; A i.233; iv.380; Nett 189.

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In my understanding, so-called "stages of enlightenment" indicate likelihood of someone attaining Nirvana in this very life -- based on their rate of progress abandoning fetters so far.

The following is according to Satyasiddhisastra:

Kulankula ("family-to-family attainer") is an intermediate stage prior to Sakadagami. This is someone who has abandoned a couple of fetters, and will abandon a couple more in this life. Even though kulankula may in theory attain Nirvana in this life, with this rate they would need 2-3 more lives ;)

Sakadagamin (once-returner) is one who has abandoned/attenuated a good chunk of fetters and therefore in theory may abandon them all and attain Nirvana in this very life, but who still has enough fetters that will most likely not be abandoned in this life yet.

Ekabijin (one-seed one) is a highest intermediate degree between Sakadagami and Anagami, not a kind of Sotapanna. Ekabijin is one who has only one empirical-world-level fetter left -- hence the name. This last fetter is the only remaining tie that keeps them attached to the empirical world. Therefore it becomes very likely that they will actually abandon this last fetter and attain Nirvana in this life.

Anagamin (never-returner) is one who has abandoned all empirical-world-level fetters and is therefore pretty much guaranteed to attain Nirvana in this life, or right after death.

Arahant (accomplished one) is one who has abandoned the abstract fetters as well -- meaning the form- and formless-level fetters.

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