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Is there a Buddhist term for a lack of self identity?

I don't (of course) mean a radical acceptance of the anatta doctrine, but whether the Buddha or any Buddhist scholar or writer, talks explicitly about being unable to take one's own personal identity seriously enough: even to the extent of becoming quite thirsty for one.

Thank you for your compassion :-)

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    I think the question is unclear. Could you elaborate on how this is different from Anatta? And the meaning of this sentence: "...being unable to take one's own personal identity seriously enough: even to the extent of becoming quite thirsty for one...". Thank you. – Lanka Aug 8 '15 at 10:09
  • by self identity i mean who you think you are based on who you've been, not from moment to moment but day to day or year to year. by thirsty i just mean psychologically attached to the experience – user3293056 Aug 8 '15 at 11:08
  • Asking about "who you think you are based on who you've been, not from moment to moment but day to day or year to year" seems unclear and highly philosophical. – Lanka Aug 8 '15 at 11:50
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    My model of development is: Pre-Ego (child, animal), Ego, Neo (self with ego not operating), Nondual (no self), and whatever comes beyond that. So, in my view, getting beyond Self is natural, inevitable (if the person develops) and should be common. But people get stuck in their Ego stage. I have only met one other person who really understood what it means to be a Neo (something like recurring, ongoing Satori), but I see it around me all the time. Perhaps this is what you are talking about? Also: Nonduality is now being studied in the research on Persistent Nonsymbolic Awareness (PNSE). – user2341 Aug 8 '15 at 16:01
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    Rats! PNSE should say Persistent Nonsymbolic Experience. (Can't edit my comment now). – user2341 Aug 8 '15 at 16:33
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If I understand this question, this might be a diffuse perception of the skhandas, as these are the groupings that might better translate as the identity constructs (in the modern sense).

In that case, i'm not sure there is a word or discussion of identity disorders (if that is what you're referring to) -- i've never seeing this being discussed in any text.

I have seen (modern) people talk about supposed risks of mindfulness meditation for people with specific mental disorders who already have difficulties with making sense and perceiving or associating (or too inclined to disassociate) certain things. But wether these are real risks of what specific practice and to whom exactly i'm not sure (e.g. some researchers do advocate mindfulness meditation to people with specific identity disorders). This is the closest link to buddhism and this lack of self identity i've heard of.

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