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If decision making is a self, why do you regret certain decisions you have made? You should be able to make all good decisions in life. Why is decision making affected by craving, aversion and ignorance? If it is a self, you should be able to disassociate it from the 3 roots of evil, at will. But you can't! That is something you need to practice and cultivate. If volition is a self, why can't you make it not cause Kamma Vipaka(consequences). Ultimately, a decision is a thought that falls under Sankhara. The 4th of the 5 aggregates. If that thought is a self, you should be able to stop it from vanishing. But you can't!

But psychology and Wikipedia tells me that there needs to be an individual or self - paraphrasing

Maybe according to psychology and Wikipedia. But not according to Buddhism. According to Buddhism there are 4 false views of self.

  1. Owner
  2. Dweller
  3. Doer
  4. Experiencer

Thinking that decision making is a self, belongs to the 'Doer' category. There is decision making, but there's no decision maker. It's similar with experiencing. There is experiencing, but there's no experiencer. The notions of decision maker and experiencer are caused due to not seeing the deciding as deciding or experiencing as experiencing and taking them as self. In other words, due to ignorance.

If decision making is a self, why do you regret certain decisions you have made? You should be able to make all good decisions in life. Why is decision making affected by craving, aversion and ignorance? If it is a self, you should be able to disassociate it from the 3 roots of evil, at will. But you can't! That is something you need to practice and cultivate. Ultimately, a decision is a thought that falls under Sankhara. The 4th of the 5 aggregates. If that thought is a self, you should be able to stop it from vanishing. But you can't!

But psychology and Wikipedia tells me that there needs to be an individual or self - paraphrasing

Maybe according to psychology and Wikipedia. But not according to Buddhism. According to Buddhism there are 4 false views of self.

  1. Owner
  2. Dweller
  3. Doer
  4. Experiencer

Thinking that decision making is a self, belongs to the 'Doer' category. There is decision making, but there's no decision maker. It's similar with experiencing. There is experiencing, but there's no experiencer. The notions of decision maker and experiencer are caused due to not seeing the deciding as deciding or experiencing as experiencing and taking them as self. In other words, due to ignorance.

If decision making is a self, why do you regret certain decisions you have made? You should be able to make all good decisions in life. Why is decision making affected by craving, aversion and ignorance? If it is a self, you should be able to disassociate it from the 3 roots of evil, at will. But you can't! That is something you need to practice and cultivate. If volition is a self, why can't you make it not cause Kamma Vipaka(consequences). Ultimately, a decision is a thought that falls under Sankhara. The 4th of the 5 aggregates. If that thought is a self, you should be able to stop it from vanishing. But you can't!

But psychology and Wikipedia tells me that there needs to be an individual or self - paraphrasing

Maybe according to psychology and Wikipedia. But not according to Buddhism. According to Buddhism there are 4 false views of self.

  1. Owner
  2. Dweller
  3. Doer
  4. Experiencer

Thinking that decision making is a self, belongs to the 'Doer' category. There is decision making, but there's no decision maker. It's similar with experiencing. There is experiencing, but there's no experiencer. The notions of decision maker and experiencer are caused due to not seeing the deciding as deciding or experiencing as experiencing and taking them as self. In other words, due to ignorance.

2 added 1 character in body
source | link

If decision making is a self, why do you regret certain decisions you have made? You should be able to make all good decisions in life. Why is decision making affected by craving, aversion and ignorance? If it is a self, you should be able to disassociate it from the 3 roots of evil, at will. But you can't! That is something you need to practice and cultivate. Ultimately, a decision is a thought that falls under Sankhara. The 4th of the 5 aggregates. If that thought is a self, you should be able to stop it from vanishing. But you can't!

But psychology and Wikipedia tells me that there needs to be an individual or self - paraphrasing

Maybe according to psychology and Wikipedia. But not according to Buddhism. According to Buddhism there are 4 false views of self.

  1. Owner
  2. Dweller
  3. Doer
  4. Experiencer

Thinking that decision making is a self, belongs to the 'Doer' category. There is decision making. But, but there's no decision maker. It's similar with experiencing. There is experiencing, but there's no experiencer. The notions of decision maker and experiencer are caused due to not seeing the deciding as deciding or experiencing as experiencing and taking them as self. In other words, due to ignorance.

If decision making is a self, why do you regret certain decisions you have made? You should be able to make all good decisions in life. Why is decision making affected by craving, aversion and ignorance? If it is a self, you should be able to disassociate it from the 3 roots of evil, at will. But you can't! That is something you need to practice and cultivate. Ultimately, a decision is a thought that falls under Sankhara. The 4th of the 5 aggregates. If that thought is a self, you should be able to stop it from vanishing. But you can't!

But psychology and Wikipedia tells me that there needs to be an individual or self - paraphrasing

Maybe according to psychology and Wikipedia. But not according to Buddhism. According to Buddhism there are 4 false views of self.

  1. Owner
  2. Dweller
  3. Doer
  4. Experiencer

Thinking that decision making is a self belongs to the 'Doer' category. There is decision making. But there's no decision maker. It's similar with experiencing. There is experiencing but there's no experiencer. The notions of decision maker and experiencer are caused due to not seeing the deciding as deciding or experiencing as experiencing and taking them as self. In other words, due to ignorance.

If decision making is a self, why do you regret certain decisions you have made? You should be able to make all good decisions in life. Why is decision making affected by craving, aversion and ignorance? If it is a self, you should be able to disassociate it from the 3 roots of evil, at will. But you can't! That is something you need to practice and cultivate. Ultimately, a decision is a thought that falls under Sankhara. The 4th of the 5 aggregates. If that thought is a self, you should be able to stop it from vanishing. But you can't!

But psychology and Wikipedia tells me that there needs to be an individual or self - paraphrasing

Maybe according to psychology and Wikipedia. But not according to Buddhism. According to Buddhism there are 4 false views of self.

  1. Owner
  2. Dweller
  3. Doer
  4. Experiencer

Thinking that decision making is a self, belongs to the 'Doer' category. There is decision making, but there's no decision maker. It's similar with experiencing. There is experiencing, but there's no experiencer. The notions of decision maker and experiencer are caused due to not seeing the deciding as deciding or experiencing as experiencing and taking them as self. In other words, due to ignorance.

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source | link

If decision making is a self, why do you regret certain decisions you have made? You should be able to make all good decisions in life. Why is decision making affected by craving, aversion and ignorance? If it is a self, you should be able to disassociate it from the 3 roots of evil, at will. But you can't! That is something you need to practice and cultivate. Ultimately, a decision is a thought that falls under Sankhara. The 4th of the 5 aggregates. If that thought is a self, you should be able to stop it from vanishing. But you can't!

But psychology and Wikipedia tells me that there needs to be an individual or self - paraphrasing

Maybe according to psychology and Wikipedia. But not according to Buddhism. According to Buddhism there are 4 false views of self.

  1. Owner
  2. Dweller
  3. Doer
  4. Experiencer

Thinking that decision making is a self belongs to the 'Doer' category. There is decision making. But there's no decision maker. It's similar with experiencing. There is experiencing but there's no experiencer. The notions of decision maker and experiencer are caused due to not seeing the deciding as deciding or experiencing as experiencing and taking them as self. In other words, due to ignorance.