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Are there any other choices (other than realizing the Truth) I will have to make for the cessation of suffering?

As long as we use many fabrications to build our reality, we may benefit from making certain choices, e.g. how to deal with those fabrications.

All these choices can lead to the same goal of realizing the Truth. (E.g. certain choices can help us in cleaning our mind from the processes which recreate illusions).

However it's possible indeed to make no other choices than the choice to realize the Truth, and come to the cessation of suffering.


cessations are happening automatically once I have realized the Truth.

Yes, that is so. No ignorance (no limited perception) means no fabrications and so on. But we should understand correctly: it means

no fabrications as "real", "solid" things.

No consciousness as "real thing",

etc. The cessation of ignorance means that the illusory nature of all "real things" is realized.

So they don't limit anything with "walls" of fabrications,

the consciousness doesn't jump from fruit to fruit, etc.

It is said that in awakening six kinds of consciousnesses turn into six kinds of wisdom.

It means that there is no consciousness as something real and existing, but the function of phenomena to be conscious manifest.


If anyone is conscious then does it mean he has not realized the Truth?

When we say "someone is conscious" we speak in terms of existing human being who is conscious. Buddha may appear to us as such being.

To Buddha, however, it may appear that there are no human beings, and no one is conscious. For example, Buddha may see instead of human beings an immense field of intertwined causes and effects.

PS. See some detailed explanations here: Is causation (hetu) in SN 22.82 different to conditions (paccaya) in Dependent Origination?

Are there any other choices (other than realizing the Truth) I will have to make for the cessation of suffering?

As long as we use many fabrications to build our reality, we may benefit from making certain choices, e.g. how to deal with those fabrications.

All these choices can lead to the same goal of realizing the Truth. (E.g. certain choices can help us in cleaning our mind from the processes which recreate illusions).

However it's possible indeed to make no other choices than the choice to realize the Truth, and come to the cessation of suffering.


cessations are happening automatically once I have realized the Truth.

Yes, that is so. No ignorance (no limited perception) means no fabrications and so on. But we should understand correctly: it means

no fabrications as "real", "solid" things.

No consciousness as "real thing",

etc. The cessation of ignorance means that the illusory nature of all "real things" is realized.

So they don't limit anything with "walls" of fabrications,

the consciousness doesn't jump from fruit to fruit, etc.

It is said that in awakening six kinds of consciousnesses turn into six kinds of wisdom.

It means that there is no consciousness as something real and existing, but the function of phenomena to be conscious manifest.


If anyone is conscious then does it mean he has not realized the Truth?

When we say "someone is conscious" we speak in terms of existing human being who is conscious. Buddha may appear to us as such being.

To Buddha, however, it may appear that there are no human beings, and no one is conscious. For example, Buddha may see instead of human beings an immense field of intertwined causes and effects.

Are there any other choices (other than realizing the Truth) I will have to make for the cessation of suffering?

As long as we use many fabrications to build our reality, we may benefit from making certain choices, e.g. how to deal with those fabrications.

All these choices can lead to the same goal of realizing the Truth. (E.g. certain choices can help us in cleaning our mind from the processes which recreate illusions).

However it's possible indeed to make no other choices than the choice to realize the Truth, and come to the cessation of suffering.


cessations are happening automatically once I have realized the Truth.

Yes, that is so. No ignorance (no limited perception) means no fabrications and so on. But we should understand correctly: it means

no fabrications as "real", "solid" things.

No consciousness as "real thing",

etc. The cessation of ignorance means that the illusory nature of all "real things" is realized.

So they don't limit anything with "walls" of fabrications,

the consciousness doesn't jump from fruit to fruit, etc.

It is said that in awakening six kinds of consciousnesses turn into six kinds of wisdom.

It means that there is no consciousness as something real and existing, but the function of phenomena to be conscious manifest.


If anyone is conscious then does it mean he has not realized the Truth?

When we say "someone is conscious" we speak in terms of existing human being who is conscious. Buddha may appear to us as such being.

To Buddha, however, it may appear that there are no human beings, and no one is conscious. For example, Buddha may see instead of human beings an immense field of intertwined causes and effects.

PS. See some detailed explanations here: Is causation (hetu) in SN 22.82 different to conditions (paccaya) in Dependent Origination?

2 minor
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Are there any other choices (other than realizing the Truth) I will have to make for the cessation of suffering?

As long as we use many fabrications to build our reality, we may benefit from making certain choices, e.g. how to deal with those fabrications.

All these choices can lead to the same goal of realizing the Truth. (E.g. certain choices can help us in cleaning our mind from the processes which recreate illusions).

However it's possible indeed to make no other choices than the choice to realize the Truth, and come to the cessation of suffering.

 

cessations are happening automatically once I have realized the Truth.

Yes, that is so. No ignorance (no limited perception) means no fabrications and so on. But we should understand correctly: it means

**no fabrications as "real", "solid" things.no fabrications as "real", "solid" things.

No consciousness as "real thing"**No consciousness as "real thing",

etc. The cessation of ignorance means that the illusory nature of all "real things" is realized.

So they don't limit anything with "walls" of fabrications,

the consciousness doesn't jump from fruit to fruit, etc.

It is said that in awakening six kinds of consciousnesses turn into six kinds of wisdom.

It means that there is no consciousness as something real and existing, but the function of phenomena to be conscious manifest.

 

If anyone is conscious then does it mean he has not realized the Truth?

When we say "someone is conscious" we speak in terms of existing human being who is conscious. Buddha may appear to us as such being.

To Buddha, however, it may appear that there are no human beings, and no one is conscious. For example, Buddha may see instead of human beings an immense field of intertwined causes and effects.

Are there any other choices (other than realizing the Truth) I will have to make for the cessation of suffering?

As long as we use many fabrications to build our reality, we may benefit from making certain choices, e.g. how to deal with those fabrications.

All these choices can lead to the same goal of realizing the Truth. (E.g. certain choices can help us in cleaning our mind from the processes which recreate illusions).

However it's possible indeed to make no other choices than the choice to realize the Truth, and come to the cessation of suffering.

cessations are happening automatically once I have realized the Truth.

Yes, that is so. No ignorance (no limited perception) means no fabrications and so on. But we should understand correctly: it means

**no fabrications as "real", "solid" things.

No consciousness as "real thing"**,

etc. The cessation of ignorance means that the illusory nature of all "real things" is realized.

So they don't limit anything with "walls" of fabrications,

the consciousness doesn't jump from fruit to fruit, etc.

It is said that in awakening six kinds of consciousnesses turn into six kinds of wisdom.

It means that there is no consciousness as something real and existing, but the function of phenomena to be conscious manifest.

If anyone is conscious then does it mean he has not realized the Truth?

When we say "someone is conscious" we speak in terms of existing human being who is conscious. Buddha may appear to us as such being.

To Buddha, however, it may appear that there are no human beings, and no one is conscious. For example, Buddha may see instead of human beings an immense field of intertwined causes and effects.

Are there any other choices (other than realizing the Truth) I will have to make for the cessation of suffering?

As long as we use many fabrications to build our reality, we may benefit from making certain choices, e.g. how to deal with those fabrications.

All these choices can lead to the same goal of realizing the Truth. (E.g. certain choices can help us in cleaning our mind from the processes which recreate illusions).

However it's possible indeed to make no other choices than the choice to realize the Truth, and come to the cessation of suffering.

 

cessations are happening automatically once I have realized the Truth.

Yes, that is so. No ignorance (no limited perception) means no fabrications and so on. But we should understand correctly: it means

no fabrications as "real", "solid" things.

No consciousness as "real thing",

etc. The cessation of ignorance means that the illusory nature of all "real things" is realized.

So they don't limit anything with "walls" of fabrications,

the consciousness doesn't jump from fruit to fruit, etc.

It is said that in awakening six kinds of consciousnesses turn into six kinds of wisdom.

It means that there is no consciousness as something real and existing, but the function of phenomena to be conscious manifest.

 

If anyone is conscious then does it mean he has not realized the Truth?

When we say "someone is conscious" we speak in terms of existing human being who is conscious. Buddha may appear to us as such being.

To Buddha, however, it may appear that there are no human beings, and no one is conscious. For example, Buddha may see instead of human beings an immense field of intertwined causes and effects.

1
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Are there any other choices (other than realizing the Truth) I will have to make for the cessation of suffering?

As long as we use many fabrications to build our reality, we may benefit from making certain choices, e.g. how to deal with those fabrications.

All these choices can lead to the same goal of realizing the Truth. (E.g. certain choices can help us in cleaning our mind from the processes which recreate illusions).

However it's possible indeed to make no other choices than the choice to realize the Truth, and come to the cessation of suffering.

cessations are happening automatically once I have realized the Truth.

Yes, that is so. No ignorance (no limited perception) means no fabrications and so on. But we should understand correctly: it means

**no fabrications as "real", "solid" things.

No consciousness as "real thing"**,

etc. The cessation of ignorance means that the illusory nature of all "real things" is realized.

So they don't limit anything with "walls" of fabrications,

the consciousness doesn't jump from fruit to fruit, etc.

It is said that in awakening six kinds of consciousnesses turn into six kinds of wisdom.

It means that there is no consciousness as something real and existing, but the function of phenomena to be conscious manifest.

If anyone is conscious then does it mean he has not realized the Truth?

When we say "someone is conscious" we speak in terms of existing human being who is conscious. Buddha may appear to us as such being.

To Buddha, however, it may appear that there are no human beings, and no one is conscious. For example, Buddha may see instead of human beings an immense field of intertwined causes and effects.