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I like to Meditate, I like to read about Meditation, I like to think about Meditation; but the word ...

"MEDITATION.. MEDITATION.."

... is always in my mind, I am attached to it.

How can I avoid this attachment?

I don't want to make Meditation as a PROBLEM. I just want to use it as a Solution. I think it will lead me to SUFFERING.

How I will meditate but remain unattached to it?

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You'll grow out of it eventually. What you are experiencing right now is the honeymoon period. Everyone goes through it. It's no different than the start of a new relationship. Everything is fresh, exciting, captivating. The word discipline is meaningless. How could you not want to sit! There is absolutely nothing wrong with this. Use this opportunity to learn as much as you can. Sit as much as you'd like. Work on developing your concentration. Just like working out, the gains that come in the beginner phase have no equivalent at any other point in your practice. Things are easy now. Take advantage of them.

But everything fades in intensity. Eventually, you are going to come to a point in your practice where maybe your sits aren't going so well. Maybe progress isn't coming as fast as it was. Perhaps you want to jump over and try a different tradition. Who knows. You might even find yourself getting bored from time to time. All of this is also normal. In fact, it's where the real practice begins. From here on out, you will learn that while sitting reaps unimaginable rewards, they don't come without work. Here, you get to stare face to face with the obstacles that are holding you back. This is where you truly understand why one Zen koan calls "sitting long and getting tired" the heart of Buddhism. These difficulties are all to be embraced. They are what cause real transformation to occur.

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very nice read! – UrsulRosu Jan 5 at 14:49
    
I'm not sure whether you're answering, I am attached to meditation, or, I am attached to the word "meditation" ... I think the OP's question was the latter. – ChrisW Jan 5 at 22:37
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I had a tough time teasing out what he was asking. I went with answering the final part of his question which was - "How will I meditate but remain unattached to it?" – neko Jan 6 at 1:33
    
Thank you @ChrisW.. you edit my question in well Format.. from next time..sorry from NOW I will write question in good format – Jyo Soudagar - Ajay Jan 6 at 4:43
    
@JyoSoudagar-Ajay You're welcome. I hope I understood you! I thought you wrote well: clearly and carefully. The syntax for formatting is called markdown and it's relatively simple (for software developers); it's summarized here and also here. The editor (input edit/text box) has an edit toolbar, but I never use it and instead I just type in the markdown directly. – ChrisW Jan 6 at 4:55

Here is the thing about attachment...

New Buddhists learn how bad attachment is and they immediately thing\k all attachments are bad. Any ironically no one care to ask "Are all the attachments bad?".


Good attachments vs Bad attachments

As you are afraid of bad attachments i assume you already know what they are so i will move on to good attachments.....


Good attachments

Not all the attachments are bad, For example the need to reach the end or the need to reach nirvana is an attachment. But without such an attachment you will not reach anywhere. So it is necessary for a being to have some incentive to work on something. And this is true to both good and bad things. So as you can see Lord Buddha never said that you should get rid of good ones along with the bad ones.

You must have this need to Meditate and you should feed it. This is called "Shraddha". Now you have realized the path and you are willingly going towards the goal.


So what is good and what is bad?

It is very simple...

If some attachment is driving you towards bad things you should try your best to get rid of that attachment.

It some attachment is driving towards the path or your personal practice you should keep that need and feed it, because it is your only true friend to push you towards the path and away from other distractions.


Hope you well, and remember...

The path is a one with comfort, But if you feel much discomfort it is because you are paying too much attention to insignificant details.If you keep practicing all the unnecessary attachments will fall without your influence and only good ones will last...

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Thank a lot @Theravada... I will remember this.."The path is a one with comfort, But if you feel much discomfort it is because you are paying too much attention to insignificant details" – Jyo Soudagar - Ajay Jan 6 at 4:39
    
Glad i could help :-) @JyoSoudagar-Ajay – Theravada Jan 6 at 15:14

Just do it, Mr/Mrs Ajay. It's like if you are in love. Talking, thinking, hoping... and then remember the time when you have been in love, when it seems to lose interest or you tend to look for a side relation.

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In German I think it is (or was) common and even necessary to use a title like Herr or Frau, but so far as I know that's less true in common English. So I would usually address the OP as simply "Ajay" because that's the name they gave us. In English "Mr/Mrs Ajay" is quite formal (almost too formal): "Just do it, Ajay." would be less formal ... it would be familiar, and read as if you're trying to be friendly. Or it's common to omit the name entirely (e.g. "Just do it. It's like if you are in love.") to concentrate on the answer. – ChrisW Jan 5 at 16:49
    
You seem to have two user accounts i.e. buddhism.stackexchange.com/users/7500/samana-johann and buddhism.stackexchange.com/users/7555/samana-johann ... is that deliberate or an accident? Why not use your (older) existing user account? It can be problematic if a person uses several different accounts. I urge you to use one single user account instead. – ChrisW Jan 5 at 16:54
    
Maybe you can merge the accounts. – Suminda Sirinath S. Dharmasena Jan 5 at 17:10
    
@Ajay This is the solution. Just do it but do it right. Doing something wrong would be problematic so be careful you are doing the right thing. – Suminda Sirinath S. Dharmasena Jan 5 at 17:13
    
@SumindaSirinathS.Dharmasena No, I cannot merge the accounts. A user can contact SE to ask that their two accounts be merged, and SE can then do it. Moderators can delete an account, but not merge one with another. – ChrisW Jan 5 at 17:50

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